There are 2 definitions of defile in English:

defile1

Line breaks: de¦file
Pronunciation: /dɪˈfʌɪl
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Damage the purity or appearance of; mar or spoil: the land was defiled by a previous owner
    More example sentences
    • The corridor was dirty, crimson stains defiling the walls.
    • He insists that no one touches Priest, a man of honor, even if he is leading the ‘foreign hordes’ who are defiling this great city.
    • We have allowed ourselves to be dirtied, to be defiled; and the worst of it is that we have done this to ourselves.
    Synonyms
    spoil, sully, mar, impair, debase, degrade; pollute, poison, corrupt, taint, tarnish, infect; foul, befoul, dirty, soil, stain; destroy, ruin
  • 1.1Desecrate or profane (something sacred): the tomb had been defiled and looted
    More example sentences
    • He insisted that Jesus - who famously ejected money-changers from a temple for defiling a sacred place - would back him.
    • This has not been the case recently, as mindless youths disrespect, desecrate and defile the church and its surrounding area.
    • Atalanta and Hippomenes are changed to lions for defiling a sacred shrine.
    Synonyms
    desecrate, profane, violate, treat sacrilegiously; make impure, contaminate, pollute, debase, degrade, dishonour, vitiate
  • 1.2 archaic Rape or sexually assault (a woman): and the Babylonians came to her into the bed of love, and they defiled her with their whoredom
    More example sentences
    • From every one talked to it is clear that men that defile girls or rape women have no excuse whatsoever.
    • She had been training to become a priestess, when she had been defiled.
    • The scoundrels who made their living plundering, murdering those who got in their way, mercilessly defiling women… it was too much for her to bear.

Derivatives

defiler

noun
More example sentences
  • And we poets understand why Dante put the defilers of language into the seventh circle of his Hell.
  • Still I laughed, imagining the defiler, a disgruntled person with a black felt pen.
  • The women reiterated their commitment to fight child labour and urged Government to implement stiffer penalties for child defilers.

Origin

late Middle English: alteration of obsolete defoul, from Old French defouler 'trample down', influenced by obsolete befile 'befoul, defile'.

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Word of the day mage
Pronunciation: meɪdʒ
noun
a magician or learned person

There are 2 definitions of defile in English:

defile2

Line breaks: de¦file
Pronunciation: /dɪˈfʌɪl
 
/

noun

Pronunciation: /also ˈdiːfʌɪl
 
/
  • A steep-sided narrow gorge or passage (originally one requiring troops to march in single file): the twisting track wormed its way up a defile to level ground
    More example sentences
    • In setting up fire pockets, an advantageous front line configuration is chosen, in gaps between strongholds, approaches to commanding heights, choke points, defiles, valleys, gorges, etc.
    • When fighting in the depths of enemy defenses the pressing sub-units concentrate on routing the enemy units defending roads and directions, defiles, narrow roads, and settlements.
    • Tanks, AT guns, and AT rocket launchers are commonly used at strong-points by troops defending road junctions, exits from valleys, gorges, tunnels, defiles, and crossings over mountain rivers.

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction] archaic Back to top  
  • (Of troops) march in single file: we emerged after defiling through the mountainsides

Origin

late 17th century: from French défilé (noun), défiler (verb), from 'away from' + file 'column, file'.

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