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diaphanous

Line breaks: di¦aph|an¦ous
Pronunciation: /dʌɪˈaf(ə)nəs
 
/

Definition of diaphanous in English:

adjective

(Especially of fabric) light, delicate, and translucent: a diaphanous dress of pale gold
More example sentences
  • In lingerie, this is expressed by delicate shapes in diaphanous fabrics which flutter around the body.
  • The house, too, is filled with colour and texture: gold, glitter, satin, lace, feathers, and yards of diaphanous fabric.
  • He would ‘flit around the backyard trailing a long piece of diaphanous fabric, in the style of the ballets Russes’.
Synonyms

Origin

early 17th century: from medieval Latin diaphanus, from Greek diaphanēs, from dia 'through' + phainein 'to show'.

More
  • dialogue from (Middle English):

    This comes via Old French and Latin from Greek dialogos, from dialegesthai ‘converse with, speak alternately’: the formative elements are dia- ‘through, across’ and legein ‘speak’. The tendency in English is to confine the sense to a conversation between two people, perhaps by associating the prefix dia- with di-. Dia- is also found in diameter (Late Middle English) ‘the measure across’; diaphanous (early 17th century) ‘shows through’; diaphragm (Late Middle English) a barrier that is literally a ‘fence through’, and diaspora (late 19th century) a scattering across.

Words that rhyme with diaphanous

polyphonous

Definition of diaphanous in:

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