There are 2 main definitions of dicky in English:

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dicky1

Line breaks: dicky
Pronunciation: /ˈdɪki
 
/
(also dickey)

noun (plural dickies or dickeys)

informal
1A false shirt front.
Example sentences
  • He is extremely proud of his Waiter's Union and always dresses well in his one tuxedo and dickey.
  • Old white men wielding Martinis and wearing dickies have occupied our nation's capital.
  • How come you never see men wearing dickies any more?
2 dated , chiefly British A folding outside seat at the back of a vehicle.
2.1 historical A driver’s seat in a carriage.
3Indian The boot of a car.
Example sentences
  • There is no STD code, only area code; your car has a hood and trunk and not a bonnet or a boot, or a dickey.
  • I have to get the dent in the dicky repaired at that time.
  • Will have the latest music system of 1000 MW or more power output and umpteen speakers all over the vehicle, dicky included.

Origin

mid 18th century (denoting a petticoat): each sense probably has different origins; perhaps partly from Dicky, pet form of the given name Richard.

More
  • The informal British word dicky, meaning ‘not strong, healthy, or functioning reliably’, dates from the late 18th century, when it had the sense ‘almost over’. The origin is not certain, but it may be from the given name Dick, in the old saying as queer as Dick's hatband. The pet form of Richard may also be behind dicky bird, a child's name for a bird. In not a dicky bird, ‘nothing at all’, it is rhyming slang for ‘word’.

Definition of dicky in:

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There are 2 main definitions of dicky in English:

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dicky2

Line breaks: dicky
Pronunciation: /ˈdɪki
 
/

adjective (dickier, dickiest)

British informal
(Of a part of the body, a structure, or a device) not strong, healthy, or functioning reliably: a pianist with a dicky heart
More example sentences
  • Andy, because of his dicky heart was excused, and was put in charge of liberating different coloured pens from the heavily guarded stock cupboard to make the graph more interesting.
  • He is Val, or Uncle Val as he likes to be known, an old man with a generous streak, a dicky heart and a customised Roller.
  • If I were to wait until some kind of separate road system for cycles is introduced, a dicky heart would have taken me to my grave before I managed to get on my bike.
Synonyms
unsound, unsteady, unreliable;
weak, frail, infirm, unhealthy, ailing, poorly, sickly, sick;
informal iffy
British informal dodgy

Origin

late 18th century (in the sense 'almost over'): perhaps from the given name Dick, in the old saying as queer as Dick's hatband.

More
  • The informal British word dicky, meaning ‘not strong, healthy, or functioning reliably’, dates from the late 18th century, when it had the sense ‘almost over’. The origin is not certain, but it may be from the given name Dick, in the old saying as queer as Dick's hatband. The pet form of Richard may also be behind dicky bird, a child's name for a bird. In not a dicky bird, ‘nothing at all’, it is rhyming slang for ‘word’.

Definition of dicky in:

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