Definition of dictator in English:

dictator

Line breaks: dic|ta¦tor
Pronunciation: /dɪkˈteɪtə
 
/

noun

1A ruler with total power over a country, typically one who has obtained control by force.
More example sentences
  • Nevertheless, even absolute monarchs or totalitarian dictators are constrained by forces beyond their control.
  • First of all, we have been supporting despots, dictators, and oligarchs in all those states for a variety of purposes.
  • Moreover, American distrust of government has long fed on the abuses of state power abroad, whether by despotic monarchs, fascist dictators or communist tyrants.
Synonyms
1.1A person who behaves in an autocratic way.
More example sentences
  • They are not representative of the public and are behaving like dictators.
  • But golf is also such a threat to autocrats and dictators because it is a game that is built around the rule of law - namely the Rules of Golf.
  • The ability of the surgeon to allow himself to become a partner, not a dictator, is critical.
1.2(In ancient Rome) a chief magistrate with absolute power, appointed in an emergency.
More example sentences
  • He defeated Pompey's troops in many battles and became the dictator of Rome.
  • Gaius Octavius, as Augustus was originally known, was 18 when in 43 BC his great-uncle, the dictator Julius Caesar, was assassinated.
  • In the early first century BC the dictator Sulla sought to eliminate his opponents by ‘proscribing’ the names of all those who were declared to be traitors.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin, from dictat- 'dictated', from the verb dictare (see dictate).

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Word of the day punctum
Pronunciation: ˈpʌŋ(k)təm
noun
a small, distinct point