Definition of digressive in English:

digressive

Line breaks: di|gres¦sive
Pronunciation: /dʌɪˈgrɛsɪv
 
/

adjective

Characterized by digression; tending to depart from the subject: a digressive account
More example sentences
  • Each was a long, highly literary, digressive, and polemical account of the failure of the colonists to make good their British patrimony.
  • His characters live untidy lives and often fall into digressive daydreams, so troubled are their souls.
  • In a word, my work is digressive, and it is progressive too, - and at the same time.

Derivatives

digressively

adverb
More example sentences
  • Whether digressively or directly, at a walk or at a run, the motion is on the ground and by foot, putting its weight part by part onto the terrain to be covered.
  • Even while he appears to be ambling digressively, he sets a stiff pace; there are few concessions to readers wanting assumptions restated or conclusions underlined.
  • This reader devoted to the great writer therefore appealingly begins with his later work, when he is in full, digressively brilliant voice writing about Paris.

digressiveness

noun
More example sentences
  • For all his digressiveness, he constantly selects and shapes, for he ever desires to maintain control over the emotions that he provokes in his reader.
  • It appears to be a specially successful job considering the verbosity and digressiveness of the novel of this writer who, though often brilliant, writes in a highly disorderly way.
  • Works such as Jonathan Swift's A Tale of a Tub and Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy made digressiveness itself a part of the satire.

More definitions of digressive

Definition of digressive in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly