Definition of dime in English:

dime

Line breaks: dime
Pronunciation: /dʌɪm
 
/

noun

North American
1A ten-cent coin.
More example sentences
  • Instead of replacing the popular dime with another coin, it's also possible to see whether the addition of a fifth coin would help.
  • People often count change by grouping pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters, a tendency indicating that, without practice, working memory can deal with only one item at a time.
  • The first day he had poured out his accumulated pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters onto the table in front of his sister, his face had beamed with pride at his contribution.
1.1 informal A small amount of money: he didn’t have a dime
More example sentences
  • Not a dime of the money stays where it nominally is.
  • Without a dime of government money we are turning thousands of people per month into independent homeowners.
  • After all, no matter who goes first overall or who slides into the second half of the first round, you're not going to see a dime of that money, and neither am I.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French disme, from Latin decima pars 'tenth part'. The word originally denoted a tithe or tenth part; the modern sense 'ten cent coin' dates from the late 18th century.

Phrases

a dime a dozen

informal Very common and of no particular value: experts in this field are a dime a dozen
More example sentences
  • Tales like these are a dime a dozen, and all have one thing in common: I don't want to hear them.
  • Ideas are a dime a dozen, but great execution is priceless.
  • Opinions of the economy's fate are a dime a dozen.

drop a (or the) dime on someone

informal Inform on someone.
More example sentences
  • I believe that he is one of the senior administration officials who dropped the dime on her.
  • He would eventually hit the 619 out of no where, then dropped the dime on him for the pinfall victory.
  • What will ultimately happen to the teenage high school student is still up in the air, but the fact of the matter is that he confessed to the crime after being turned in, and those who dropped dime on him did so for the reward money.

get off the dime

informal Be decisive and show initiative.
More example sentences
  • I share a lot of the criticism for the police, I think they were very slow in getting off the dime.
  • One more thing, there was a poll, I can't remember - and I don't think we ought to do this by polls, but 71 percent of the American people say get off the dime.
  • I wish people would understand that, and I wish this jury would really get off the dime and start deliberating a little more conscientiously and get this thing finished with.

on a dime

informal Used to refer to a manoeuvre that can be performed within a small area or short distance: boats that can turn on a dime
More example sentences
  • He runs beautiful, precision short routes and can cut on a dime.
  • The Fed Chairman, of course, turned his fiscal rectitude on a dime as soon as the Republicans regained control of the Treasury.
  • The last couple of years has seen the series shift to arcade-style action, but the new momentum-based skating could spell an end to skaters stopping and turning on a dime.

Definition of dime in:

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