Definition of dimension in English:

dimension

Line breaks: di¦men|sion
Pronunciation: /dɪˈmɛnʃ(ə)n
 
, dʌɪ-/

noun

1 (usually dimensions) A measurable extent of a particular kind, such as length, breadth, depth, or height: the final dimensions of the pond were 14 ft x 8 ft [mass noun]: the drawing must be precise in dimension
More example sentences
  • The dim, candlelit interior contrives to make them shift in dimension and depth; new nooks appear wherever you look, some of them illusions created by subtle mirrors.
  • Entries will be strictly limited to a maximum of 600 mm in their greatest dimension i.e. length, breadth or height.
  • As the final dimensions measure a mere 1.2 x 0.7 x 0.2 metres, two of these cases could be transported easily in the back of a car.
Synonyms
1.1A mode of linear extension of which there are three in space and two on a flat surface, which corresponds to one of a set of coordinates specifying the position of a point.
More example sentences
  • String theory holds that different modes of vibration reveal themselves in our measly four dimensions of space and time as different particles and forces.
  • This analogy has a problem, however, in that one tends to be aware that the two-dimensional surface is embedded in the three dimensions of our ordinary space.
  • You score points by assessing the position of your knights on the castles, multiplying a knight's vertical position by the spatial dimensions of the structure.
1.2 Physics An expression for a derived physical quantity in terms of fundamental quantities such as mass, length, or time, raised to the appropriate power (acceleration, for example, having the dimension of length × time−2).
More example sentences
  • Explicit formulas in terms of dimensions of the figures can be deduced from these theorems.
  • Outlines may be captured as rectangular coordinates or Fourier coefficients and, even when non-fractal, analysed in terms of fractal dimensions.
  • Divide as above and voila, you have your fractal dimension.
2An aspect or feature of a situation: we must focus on the cultural dimensions of the problem
More example sentences
  • We also seem this winter to be treating patients with more complex conditions requiring greater time in hospital, thereby adding a new dimension to the situation we normally face.
  • Therefore the organization of the exhibition during Ramadhan will add a cultural dimension to this holy month.
  • Those humour-laced lines join to give a new dimension to contemporary situations and personalities.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Cut or shape (something) to particular measurements.
More example sentences
  • The deviator block was dimensioned at 1200 mm but scaled 1500 mm.
  • The shortest possible braking distances are guaranteed by the generously dimensioned AMG high-performance braking system behind the AMG light-alloy wheels, which features internally ventilated and indented brake discs all-round.
  • To eliminate waste, he dimensioned the house to accept stock framing pieces and chose materials such as sustainably harvested mahogany for the siding, synthetic-slate roofs, recycled flora tires, and real stucco.
1.1 (usually as adjective dimensioned) Mark (a diagram) with measurements.
More example sentences
  • Existing utilities and foundations may not be exactly where expected nor properly dimensioned on old drawings.
  • Shop drawings for the stone were completed and dimensioned accurately and rapidly.
  • Never layout or cut stringers until you have it all worked out on paper by drawing a dimensioned, section view of the stairs.

Origin

late Middle English (in sense 1 of the noun): via Old French from Latin dimensio(n-), from dimetiri 'measure out'. sense 2 of the noun dates from the 1920s.

Derivatives

dimensional

adjective
[in combination]: multi-dimensional scaling

dimensionless

adjective
More example sentences
  • So I count eleven parameters - really only ten, since only dimensionless ratios of mass scales matter - each of which needs to be specified to three significant digits or fewer.
  • We have learned to see photographs, not so much as substantive objects, but as flat, dimensionless, even transparent windows that give view to other places and times.
  • In string theory the known elementary particles are no longer described as dimensionless mathematical point-objects but rather as extended one-dimensional objects (hence the name ‘string’).

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