Definition of disfavour in English:

disfavour

Line breaks: dis|favour
Pronunciation: /dɪsˈfeɪvə
 
/
(US disfavor)

noun

[mass noun]
1Disapproval or dislike: the headmaster regarded her with disfavour
More example sentences
  • There is nothing new in this: the Monarchy has almost always been regarded with disfavour, so has the ‘Establishment’, especially when times were bad.
  • A decision-maker may have unfairly regarded with disfavour one party's case either consciously or unconsciously.
  • Spam has retained some popularity in various parts of the world, although regarded with disfavour by those who eschew processed foods or have pretensions to gourmet status.
Synonyms
disapproval, disapprobation, lack of favour; dislike, displeasure, distaste, dissatisfaction, low opinion, low esteem
1.1The state of being disliked: coal fell into disfavour because steam engines are noisy and polluting
More example sentences
  • Because they are difficult to grow, farro and spelt fell into disfavor as farmers turned to raising the more profitable and high-yielding commercial wheat variety.
  • Human intelligence fell into disfavor during the 90's, even into the 80's.
  • It fell into disfavor when synthetic thyroid became more popular.
Synonyms
become unpopular, become disliked, get on the wrong side of someone
informal be/get in someone's bad books, be/get in someone's black books, be in the doghouse
New Zealand informal be in the dogbox

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Put at a disadvantage or treat as undesirable: the system favours those who employ less labour and disfavours those who employ more
More example sentences
  • He urged military tribunals, disfavored any civilian participation and even opposed giving defendants a presumption of innocence.
  • In the United States legislation disfavouring the relationship between illegitimate children and their natural parents was quite common well into the twentieth century.
  • Daughters are disfavoured because families have to cough up huge dowries when they wed - which can range from US $100 to a new car, jewellery, apartments or more, depending on a family's social standing.

Definition of disfavour in:

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