Definition of dissect in English:

dissect

Line breaks: dis|sect
Pronunciation: /dʌɪˈsɛkt
 
, dɪ-/

verb

[with object]
1Methodically cut up (a body or plant) in order to study its internal parts: an animal’s eye can be easily dissected
More example sentences
  • In order to paint the human form better, he studied anatomy, dissecting many cadavers at a time when this was unusual, and drawing them in painstaking detail.
  • From each plant one randomly chosen, fresh flower was dissected under a binocular microscope to separate the corolla, androecium and gynoecium.
  • Come 9pm it is hard to avoid a body being dissected or a corpse in a state of decomposition.
Synonyms
anatomize, cut up, cut/lay open, dismember; vivisect
1.1Analyse (a text or idea) in minute detail: he dissected the Prime Minister’s statement and revealed the truth behind it
More example sentences
  • It begins by looking at literary analysis where it is normal to dissect texts to understand the techniques they use to achieve aesthetic technique.
  • Thirty-six competitions, the majority for public projects, their submitted images, models and texts, are dissected in detail.
  • Echevarria brilliantly dissects the ideas of these thinkers.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin dissect- 'cut up', from the verb dissecare, from dis- 'apart' + secare 'to cut'.

Derivatives

dissector

noun
More example sentences
  • The Periosteal dissectors and scissors are 12 cm long and they may be straight or curved.
  • It was not known in Edinburgh or London, when I demonstrated it, and it is now detected in one of thirty subjects, when dissectors are attentive.
  • No lesser homage must be paid to them by dissectors.

Definition of dissect in:

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