Definition of divaricate in English:

divaricate

Line breaks: di|vari|cate
Pronunciation: /dʌɪˈvarɪkeɪt
 
, dɪ-/

verb

[no object] technical or literary
Stretch or spread apart; diverge widely: her crow’s feet are divaricating like deltas
More example sentences
  • Opportunities and pursuing things that are different from the norm - not divaricating in other directions - are fundamental to Martens's approach.
  • The Jurassic Mytilus furcatus Münster has finely nodose, moderately divaricating costae over the whole shell.
  • The fuzzy outlines of divaricating plants like coprosma virescens and low grasses should always be placed with bolder foliage for an exciting contrast.

adjective

Botany Back to top  

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin divaricat- 'stretched apart', from the verb divaricare, from di- (expressing intensive force) + varicare 'stretch the legs apart' (from varicus 'straddling').

Derivatives

divarication

Pronunciation: /-ˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • There is, however, a larger plot to the poem, wherein all of its disparate elements and wild divarications find their home.
  • Another interesting feature was divarication of midline abdominal musculature, which required correction.
  • It seamed that between extratonal and neo-tonal codes there were nothing but divarications.

Definition of divaricate in:

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