There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock1

Line breaks: dock
Pronunciation: /dɒk
 
/

noun

1An enclosed area of water in a port for the loading, unloading, and repair of ships: the boat nosed up to a dock [mass noun]: the tanker was coming into dock [as modifier]: dock workers
More example sentences
  • Once China lost control of its repair docks at Port Arthur, nothing could be done to put its damaged foreign-built ships back in service.
  • There, slowly sailing towards them was a large ship coming from the docks of Port Refuge.
  • I was working part-time at the docks, unloading the ship's cargo boxes and supplies.
Synonyms
1.1 (docks) A group of docks along with wharves and associated buildings.
More example sentences
  • Blaise walked along the docks, holding his breath as the unfamiliar scent of fish reached his nose, making him gag.
  • At one point 16,000 dockers organised mobile pickets and closed the docks along the Thames.
  • The report recommends a maximum height of 12 storeys in underdeveloped areas such as around Heuston Station, Spencer Dock and the south docks.
1.2 short for dry dock.
More example sentences
  • We drive through the long tunnel until we reach the dry docks.
1.3North American A jetty or pier where a ship may moor.
More example sentences
  • Geoff was waiting for him on the rickety wooden dock that stretched out into the river.
  • They all did the required swimming test then headed over to the boat dock.
  • He made his way to a boat dock and pulled himself up onto it.
1.4 (also loading dock) A platform for loading lorries or goods trains.
More example sentences
  • As the convoy arrived at the dock, the lorry doors opened and the exhausted, terrified lambs poured out, trying desperately to stay upright and avoid trampling each other.
  • Each window is dimensionally similar to a loading dock.
  • Three separate tractor-trailer loading docks on two different levels can accommodate 36 trailers simultaneously.
2A device in which a laptop, smartphone, or other mobile device may be placed for charging, providing access to a power supply and to peripheral devices or auxiliary features; a docking station.
More example sentences
  • You put four AA batteries in it and then plug the H320 into its dock and the AAs recharge the H320's battery.
  • The camera comes without too many extras, though a rechargeable battery and charging dock were welcome additions to the package.
  • The 15Gb model doesn't come with a remote or dock, while the 40Gb will be over-expensive (and expansive) for most people.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1(Of a ship) come into a dock and tie up at a wharf: the ship docked at Southampton
More example sentences
  • The bars scraped along the concrete landing ramps as the ferry docks.
  • The next morning the ship docked at the main port of Indian Island.
  • Wives of seamen could only visit their husbands when his ship docked at its home port.
Synonyms
1.1 [with object] Bring (a ship or boat) into a dock: the yard where the boats were docked and maintained
More example sentences
  • Over 15,500 boats were docked at these marinas.
  • The Quays welcomed two Galway Hooker sailing boats and a flotilla of sailing vessels were docked at Albert Basin.
  • They learn how to fish, including how to bait the hook, tie knots and rig tackle, even back up a trailer and dock a boat.
1.2(Of a spacecraft) join with a space station or another spacecraft in space: most spaceships docked at the orbital transit station the module was scheduled for docking in March
More example sentences
  • After that both radar systems broke down which meant that we knew for certain the commander would have to dock with the Space Station manually.
  • He was Commander of Atlantis as it docked with the Russian space station Mir.
  • This shuttle would not even be docking with the International Space Station.
1.3Attach (a piece of equipment) to another: the user wants to dock a portable into a desktop computer
More example sentences
  • They lowered the module back into place and successfully docked it onto the Raptors hull.
  • Light-emitting diodes indicate that the system has been docked successfully.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German docke, of unknown origin.

Phrases

in dock

(Of a ship) moored in a dock.
More example sentences
  • We don't know from the ship's log whether that ship was sailing that night, although normally on a Sunday night, the ship is in dock and doesn't sail.
  • ‘Besides, you said you'd think about it,’ Len said confidently as they were walking back to the ship that was in dock.
  • When the captain had read Maxwell's letter he told him that the ship had been in dock for four years and he could not afford to sail her.
British informal (Of a person) not fully fit and out of action: he grazed my arm and put me in dock for a couple of days
More example sentences
  • Unluckily I managed to spend that five weeks in dock, a very boring time as they kept me in bed all the time.

Definition of dock in:

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Word of the day animalcule
Pronunciation: ˌanɪˈmalkjuːl
noun
a microscopic animal

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock2

Line breaks: dock
Pronunciation: /dɒk
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Deduct (something, especially an amount of money or a point in a game): the agency enforce payments by docking money from the father’s salary [with two objects]: he was docked a penalty point
More example sentences
  • The scheme is operated by the employer, who docks the money each week and passes it to the charities.
  • After that event at school, his parents had grounded him for a month, and docked his allowance until Christmas.
  • If staff forget their swipe card they are sent home to retrieve it - and the pay is docked for the amount of time they spend going home to get it.
Synonyms
deduct, subtract, remove, debit, discount, take off, take away
informal knock off, minus
reduce, cut, cut back, decrease, lessen, diminish
2Cut short (an animal’s tail): their tails were docked
More example sentences
  • Such dogs were exempt from taxes, and their owners docked the dogs' tails to document their occupation.
  • Aside from the schipperke's thick ruff, the most striking feature of the breed is its tail - or lack thereof, since the tail is typically docked.
  • If the tail must be docked, the breed standard dictates that no more than one third of the tail may be removed.
Synonyms
cut off, cut short, shorten, crop, lop, prune, truncate; remove, amputate, detach, disconnect, sever, hack off, chop off, take off
rare dissever

noun

Back to top  
1The solid bony or fleshy part of an animal’s tail, excluding the hair.
More example sentences
  • Jason grabbed the towels and spread them at the dog's tail and dock.
1.1The stump left after a tail has been docked.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps related to Frisian dok 'bunch, ball (of string etc.)' and German Docke 'doll'. The original noun sense was 'the solid part of an animal's tail', whence the verb sense 'cut short an animal's tail', later generalized to 'reduce, deduct'.

Definition of dock in:

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock3

Line breaks: dock
Pronunciation: /dɒk
 
/

noun

The enclosure in a criminal court where a defendant stands or sits: the nine others in the dock face a combination of charges
More example sentences
  • He was flanked by two police officers and a court security officer as he stood in the glass-enclosed dock at Harrogate Magistrates Court.
  • The new initiative comes just months after a defendant leapt over the dock at Southend court and made a dash for freedom.
  • Another image on her studio workbench was of a very young man with his eyes downcast, sitting in a dock next to a court officer.

Origin

late 16th century: probably originally slang and related to Flemish dok 'chicken coop, rabbit hutch', of unknown origin.

Definition of dock in:

There are 4 definitions of dock in English:

dock4

Line breaks: dock
Pronunciation: /dɒk
 
/

noun

A coarse weed of temperate regions, with inconspicuous greenish or reddish flowers. The leaves are used to relieve nettle stings.
  • Genus Rumex, family Polygonaceae
More example sentences
  • This is rarer and is usually caused by weeds such as nettles and docks, late flowering plants and fungal spores.
  • Pesticides, similarly, were unknown: docks, nettles and thistles were scythed away by hand just as they came into seed.
  • I was out with this dangerous looking implement this afternoon, cutting down nettles, rosebay and docks nearly as tall as I am.

Origin

Old English docce, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dialect dokke.

Definition of dock in: