There are 2 definitions of dory in English:

dory1

Line breaks: dory
Pronunciation: /ˈdɔːri
 
/

noun (plural dories)

A narrow deep-bodied fish with a mouth that can be opened very wide.
  • Several genera and species in the families Zeidae and Oreosomatidae. See also John Dory
More example sentences
  • The price for top grade fish like monk and dory is down considerably.
  • Also found in the deep sea are the most valuable species of orange roughy, alfonsino and oreo dories.
  • The baitfish tightened into a ball as the kingfish attacked, while several snapper and dory moved in hoping to share the spoils.

Origin

late Middle English: from French dorée, feminine past participle of dorer 'gild', from late Latin deaurare 'gild over', based on Latin aurum 'gold'. Compare with dorado.

Definition of dory in:

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Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: niːˈɒt(ə)ni
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal

There are 2 definitions of dory in English:

dory2

Line breaks: dory
Pronunciation: /ˈdɔːri
 
/

noun (plural dories)

A small flat-bottomed rowing boat with a high bow and stern, originally of a kind used for fishing in New England.
More example sentences
  • Training is done in a fleet of five dories with outboard motors, with a similar number awaiting work to bring them back into service.
  • The central compound of parliamentary buildings has been compared to the forms of a cluster of overturned, beached fishing dories.
  • Far more satisfying, however, was picking off the slower vessels that had started before us: the lumbering dories, skiffs, and wherries.

Origin

early 18th century: perhaps from Miskito dóri 'dugout'.

Definition of dory in: