Definition of draught in English:

draught

Line breaks: draught
Pronunciation: /drɑːft
 
/
(US draft)

noun

1A current of cool air in a room or other confined space: heavy curtains at the windows cut out draughts
More example sentences
  • Loft insulation prevents heat from rising and going straight through the roof, while draught proofing cuts out unpleasant draughts from around windows, external doors, letterboxes, keyholes and cat flaps.
  • He offered her a small wave, then left, shutting the door so quickly that it blew a draught across the room.
  • The medical bay was actually an old khaki army tent, so whenever the breeze blew a draught came through the front entrance flaps.
Synonyms
current of air, rush of air, breath, whiff, waft, wind, breeze, gust, puff, blast, gale
informal blow
literary zephyr
2A single act of drinking or inhaling: she downed the remaining beer in one draught
More example sentences
  • He filled three cups from a large flask, passing them round and drinking a long draught from his own, before introducing himself as Seth.
  • Then they gave him a groat, which he put in his pocket; a crust of bread, which he ate; and a full bowl of ale, which he drank off at a draught.
  • He ended, and emptied his tankard in a single draught.
2.1The amount swallowed or inhaled in a draught: he took deep draughts of oxygen into his lungs
More example sentences
  • He produced a bottle of wine, took a deep draught, and burst into a heartfelt rendition of Je Ne Regrette Rien.
  • Time to pull myself together, swig a good deep draught of Andrew's Liver Salts, and get cracking.
  • He took a deep draught from his mug, setting it down empty.
Synonyms
gulp, drink, swallow, mouthful
informal swig, swill, slug
North American informal chug
2.2 literary or archaic A quantity of a liquid with medicinal properties: a sleeping draught
More example sentences
  • There was a boyish grin on Raphael's face, something that he often had when he was making draughts or medicines for his own amusement.
  • I suspected Claudius had mixed a draught with his medicine.
  • Before Luke's horrified eyes, Jaid swallowed the immortality draught and, with a shocked gasped, collapsed onto the ground before him, unconscious.
3The depth of water needed to float a ship: the shallow draught enabled her to get close inshore
More example sentences
  • The shallow draught of these ships meant that they were able to reach far inland by river and stream, striking and moving on before local forces could muster.
  • The shallow draft of 0.9m to 2.3m allows the ship to access very shallow waters denied to other vessels.
  • The docking facilities must be big enough to cope with the 26 foot draught of Liberty ships and at the same time provide sheltered water for smaller vessels, such as landing craft, to operate.
4The drawing in of a fishing net.
4.1The fish taken at one drawing; a catch.
More example sentences
  • When the loops closed, both sets of men struggled like the Lord's Apostles to pull the draught of fishes ashore.

adjective

[attributive] Back to top  
1Denoting beer or cider served from a barrel or tank rather than from a bottle or can: draught ale
More example sentences
  • Sales of draught beer and cider have fallen by 11.5% in the first four months of this year in pubs, according to figures from the Irish Brewers' Association.
  • The festival provides an opportunity to relish the distinctive flavours of this dish along with barrels of chilled draught beer accompanied by soul-stirring live ghazals.
  • The micro-brewery at the Foresters Arms at Carlton-in-Coverdale produces draught ales and a new range of bottled beers which will be unveiled next month.
2Denoting an animal used for pulling heavy loads: a draught horse
More example sentences
  • The number of horses was scarcely up to the average, the heavy draught horses being not quite so plentiful.
  • He was diminutive, and how he managed to lift the heavy harness on the draught horses for ploughing was more than I could understand.
  • In 1954, British Railways had stopped using the Nelson Street stables for their draught horses.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'drawing, pulling'; also 'something drawn, a load'): from Old Norse dráttr, of Germanic origin; related to German Tracht, also to draw. Compare with draft.

Phrases

feel the draught

informal Experience an adverse change in one’s financial circumstances: the high street shops will feel the draught most keenly
More example sentences
  • We're in the grip of an unexpected ceasefire: for the past five seasons, at least one big boss man had felt the draught of the revolving door by now.
  • Many prestigious departments are now feeling the draft.
  • Most pawns were wiped out in the process as well, and it seemed that both Kings were feeling the draft.

on draught

(Of beer or cider) ready to be drawn from a barrel or tank; not bottled or canned.
More example sentences
  • Catering for the area's ever-growing number of up and coming professionals, there is a wonderful wine list including top champagnes and Freedom organic beer on draught.
  • There are four beers on draught and the selection will change regularly to bring members the best from around the world.
  • In a pub, where the beer is on draught, most servers will be happy to let you have a taste of a brand that's new to you.

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