Definition of dusk in English:

dusk

Line breaks: dusk
Pronunciation: /dʌsk
 
/

noun

verb

[no object] literary Back to top  
  • Grow dark: (as adjective dusking) he saw the lights blaze in the dusking sky
    More example sentences
    • I watch the horizon dusking ripe and remember the darkness of that one film - the scene, that scene, when she collapses.
    • The night of the dance dawned - or should I say dusked?
    • She gazed into his troubled face, dark hair falling across green eyes, sunlight dusking his pale skin, like fate waking up to morning air.

adjective

literary Back to top  
  • Shadowy, dim, or dark: the dusk demesnes of night
    More example sentences
    • She refused to be startled by the shifting dusk shadows.
    • They used the dusk shadows to their advantage by hiding in them.
    • From the valley comes a drumbeat of hooves as a tall horse gallops through the dusk shadows, bare but for a slim, young boy.

Origin

Old English dox 'dark, swarthy' and doxian 'darken in colour', of Germanic origin; related to Old High German tusin 'darkish'; compare with dun1 The noun dates from the early 17th century The change in form from -x to -sk occurred in Middle English.

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