There are 2 definitions of dyke in English:

dyke1

Line breaks: dyke
Pronunciation: /dʌɪk
 
/
(also dike)

noun

informal
A lesbian.

Origin

1940s (earlier as bulldyke): of unknown origin.

Derivatives

dykey

adjective (dykier, dykiest)

Definition of dyke in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily

There are 2 definitions of dyke in English:

dyke2

Line breaks: dyke
Pronunciation: /dʌɪk
 
/
(also dike)

noun

1A long wall or embankment built to prevent flooding from the sea.
More example sentences
  • Ponds are separated by dikes that prevent flooding and provide access routes to the ponds for electricity and aerator motors.
  • As they camped in the fields in sight of the city walls the Mongols surprised them by smashing the dams and dikes nearby and flooding the encampment.
  • The Netherlands is a land protected from flooding by dykes and dams.
1.1 [often in place names] A low wall or earthwork serving as a boundary or defence: Offa’s Dyke
More example sentences
  • The busy prehistory is known rather than seen in the shadow remnants of dikes and earthworks.
  • The 80 ha. site is best viewed from the well-preserved boundary dykes, forming the eastern side of the oppidum beside Cutham Lane.
  • The dyke represents a Bronze Age tribal boundary, but was being damaged by mountain bikers.
1.2A causeway.
More example sentences
  • The result of all this was to show that the cursus had always been a single, banked-up pathway between ditches - in other words not really a cursus at all, more a ceremonial causeway or dyke.
  • The first ramp, which slopes from the dike down to the park, is divided by a glass wall such that it serves as an external connecting passage between the park and dike, an entrance to the building and an internal space.
  • After that, she led us along a thin, icy path on a dike between the channel and a deep, muddy ditch with sharp sticks jutting up from the bottom.
2A ditch or watercourse.
More example sentences
  • They were also carrying out routine checks of dykes, rivers and ditches in the area, and Mr Hankins said divers were on stand-by.
  • The ditches, dikes and reed-edged fleets that crisscross the grazing marshes here are rich in invertebrates, including the scarce emerald damselfly.
  • There's also something called the Klamath Straits Drain, along with scores of channelized creeks, uncountable dikes, and an aqueduct called the Lost River Diversion Channel.
3 Geology An intrusion of igneous rock cutting across existing strata. Compare with sill.
More example sentences
  • Evidently, the wealth of minerals found at Brumado is related to the intrusion of igneous dikes and subsequent associated hydrothermal mineralization.
  • There are no mafic dykes or intrusions of similar age to the granitic rocks that could imply contemporaneous mafic magmatism.
  • A swarm of mafic igneous dikes have intruded the Estes pegmatite and make a showy display in the quarry face.
4Australian/NZ informal , dated A toilet.

verb

[with object] (often as adjective dyked) Back to top  
Provide (land) with a wall or embankment to prevent flooding.
More example sentences
  • The fertility of those dyked lands was unrivalled, generating great agricultural productivity.
  • In 1968, a rock-filled dam with a flood control gate system was built in the New Brunswick, as a road connection and to protect diked farmland from flooding.
  • The family was told not to spend money diking the property as the Socreds, when they came to power in 1975, had plans to purchase the property.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a trench or ditch): from Old Norse dík, related to ditch. (sense 1) of the noun) has been influenced by Middle Low German dīk 'dam' and Middle Dutch dijc 'ditch, dam'.

Phrases

put one's finger in the dyke

Attempt to stem the advance of something undesirable.
[from a story of a small Dutch boy who saved his community from flooding, by placing his finger in a hole in a dyke]
More example sentences
  • Don't let people criticise you for this - after all, the hurricane was over and what the heck could you do, put your finger in the dike?
  • Sometimes it's hard to put your finger in the dyke when you are sitting in the stand, but we certainly did things that we didn't do in practice and we haven't done in the rest of the tournament.

Definition of dyke in: