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edifying

Line breaks: edify|ing
Pronunciation: /ˈɛdɪfʌɪɪŋ
 
/

Definition of edifying in English:

adjective

1Providing moral or intellectual instruction: edifying literature
More example sentences
  • But like everybody else in public life, from politicians and pundits to performers and poets, Stewart wants to seem edifying and instructive.
  • Rather than show my disdain outright and attach my friend's moral shortcomings, I started to ruminate a more edifying scheme.
  • The way I propose here is to consider how the biblical writers themselves dealt with difficult texts, that is, how they handled elements of the tradition which they could no longer accept as ethical or edifying.
1.1 [with negative] Used to express one’s disapproval of something: seeing a person blind drunk is not an edifying sight
More example sentences
  • It was not a particularly edifying sight to see him reduced to playing in a lower Scottish league.
  • The antics of government ministers when it comes to accepting responsibility or, more usually, evading responsibility, when things go wrong in their departments is not an edifying sight.
  • People would say that this wasn't an edifying sight, this is wrong.

Derivatives

edifyingly

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • I believe that Strauss remains so universally well-loved because his music is not just stylish and attractive, but also edifyingly well bolted together.
  • But it has been five centuries since Dante conducted a census of the Inferno and published his edifyingly vivid descriptions of the torments of the damned.

Definition of edifying in:

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Pronunciation: vɪˈdʒɛsɪm(ə)l
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