Definition of eerie in English:

eerie

Line breaks: eerie
Pronunciation: /ˈɪəri
 
/

adjective (eerier, eeriest)

Derivatives

eerily

adverb
[as submodifier]: it was eerily quiet
More example sentences
  • The streets were eerily quiet, but other than that and the constant wail of sirens, nothing much looked out of the ordinary.
  • London's foreign exchange markets, normally the scene of frenetic activity, were eerily quiet.
  • The first night we crossed a boiling river, its steam eerily brilliant in our headlights.

eeriness

noun
More example sentences
  • There was an aura of strangeness around the set, a sort of quiet eeriness to it all.
  • I'm thinking of the score Philip Glass did for Dracula and how it brought the film to a whole new level of eeriness, an emotional impact that I don't think it ever achieved before that.
  • But, today there was just this eeriness about the place that I could not explain and office space was being given away for $0.50 per square foot.

Origin

Middle English (originally northern English and Scots in the sense 'fearful'): probably from Old English earg 'cowardly', of Germanic origin; related to German arg.

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