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emend

Line breaks: emend
Pronunciation: /ɪˈmɛnd
 
/

Definition of emend in English:

verb

[with object]
1Make corrections and revisions to (a text): these studies show him collating manuscripts and emending texts
More example sentences
  • The first were the scabini, officials with specific juridical competence, the second were the iudices, responsible for reproducing and emending juridical texts, and finally the custodians of the lay archives.
  • Many modern editions, including the Oxford, take the view that the novel in part derives from the play, and use it to emend the defective quarto text.
  • But the work shall not be wholly lost: for it will, as he believed, appear once more, in a new and more perfect edition, corrected and emended by another author.
Synonyms
correct, rectify, repair, fix;
improve, enhance, polish, refine, clarify;
expurgate, censor, redact, bowdlerize
1.1Alter (something that is incorrect): the year of his death might need to be emended to 652
More example sentences
  • In 1969, Rolfe correctly emended the spellings of the archaeostracan families by inserting id before the familial suffix.
  • The guest curator, John Ayers, has written an essay for the catalogue that emends flaws in dating and attribution erroneously accepted as the last word for decades.
  • This arrangement was followed by Whittington in the Treatise, but was emended in 1963.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin emendare, from e- (variant of ex-) 'out of' + menda 'a fault'. Compare with amend.

Definition of emend in:

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