Definition of endue in English:

endue

Line breaks: en¦due
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈdjuː
 
, ɛn-/
(also indue)

verb (endues, enduing, endued)

[with object] literary
Endow or provide with a quality or ability: our sight would be endued with a far greater sharpness
More example sentences
  • Martin Luther once wrote, ‘The defects in a preacher are soon spied; let a preacher be endued with ten virtues, and but one fault, yet this one fault will eclipse and darken all his virtues and gifts.’
  • At the time of Jesus' ascension, He said to His disciples, ‘Behold, I send the Promise of My Father upon you; but tarry in the city of Jerusalem until you are endued with power from on high ‘.
  • And he [Solomon, using the royal ‘we’] said: ‘O men, we have been taught the speech of birds, and we are endued with everything.’

Origin

late Middle English (also in the sense 'induct into an ecclesiastical living'): from Old French enduire, partly from Latin inducere 'lead in' (see induce), reinforced by the sense of Latin induere 'put on clothes'.

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily