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engender

Line breaks: en|gen¦der
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈdʒɛndə
 
, ɛn-/

Definition of engender in English:

verb

[with object]
1Cause or give rise to (a feeling, situation, or condition): the issue engendered continuing controversy
More example sentences
  • Barnett is unable to lead, inspire or engender loyalty.
  • We will build on our strengths and continue to engender a love of learning across all subjects for all our students.
  • Many of these changes engender anxiety and fear.
Synonyms
1.1 archaic (Of a father) beget (offspring).
Example sentences
  • I can not imagine returning home from watching a film and deciding to engender a child.
  • Urging prospective fathers to take care that their seed is of the right temperature to engender children of a good physical and psychological temper, Charron offers them some practical advice.
  • When, in turn, we biologically engender a child with a partner, the two parents are equally invested and morally responsible for the child.

Origin

Middle English (formerly also as ingender): from Old French engendrer, from Latin ingenerare, from in- 'in' + generare 'beget' (see generate).

Definition of engender in:

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