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entice Line breaks: en¦tice
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈtʌɪs/
/ɛnˈtʌɪs/

Definition of entice in English:

verb

[with object]
Attract or tempt by offering pleasure or advantage: a show which should entice a new audience into the theatre [with object and infinitive]: the treat is offered to entice the dog to eat
More example sentences
  • For those with jobs, this may not sound like a particularly enticing prospect.
  • The club has come up with an attractive membership pack to entice new members.
  • This was too enticing a prospect to let pass before we commenced our craft tour.
Synonyms

Derivatives

enticer

1
noun
Example sentences
  • To secure its rights, it evidently provided legal aid to one firm that sought to enforce its indentures against enticers.
  • The solicitor or enticer of a person to commit acts of prostitution will be liable for imprisonment of from one year to ten years.

Origin

Middle English (also in the sense 'incite, provoke'; formerly also as intice): from Old French enticier, probably from a base meaning 'set on fire', based on an alteration of Latin titio 'firebrand'.

More
  • Early senses of entice included ‘incite’ and ‘provoke (to anger)’. It is from Old French enticier which probably had a root meaning ‘set on fire’, and was an alteration of Latin titio ‘firebrand’.

Words that rhyme with entice

advice, bice, Brice, choc ice, concise, dice, gneiss, ice, imprecise, lice, mice, nice, precise, price, rice, sice, slice, speiss, spice, splice, suffice, syce, thrice, top-slice, trice, twice, underprice, vice, Zeiss

Definition of entice in:

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