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entire

Line breaks: en¦tire
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈtʌɪə
 
, ɛn-/

Definition of entire in English:

adjective

1 [attributive] With no part left out; whole: my plans are to travel the entire world
More example sentences
  • For one eerily glorious moment in time, the whole entire world seemed to be completely silent.
  • Now, they are marketed as essential and whole supermarket aisles and entire shops are devoted to selling them.
  • I am afraid that a whole country, an entire people, will be destroyed for nothing.
Synonyms
whole, complete, total, full;
continuous, unbroken, uninterrupted, undivided
1.1Without qualification or reservations; absolute: an ideological system with which he is in entire agreement
More example sentences
  • This Agreement embodies the entire understanding of the Parties as it relates to the subject matter hereof.
  • This sounds like entire supposition, and I would like to know what reasoning is behind it.
Synonyms
2Not broken, damaged, or decayed.
Example sentences
  • Because a crystalline solid is regular, we can see the inner form of the entire solid by looking at a fragment.
Synonyms
3(Of a male horse) not castrated.
4 Botany (Of a leaf) without indentations or division into leaflets.

noun

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Origin

late Middle English (formerly also as intire): from Old French entier, based on Latin integer 'untouched, whole', from in- 'not' + tangere 'to touch'.

Definition of entire in:

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