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equate

Line breaks: equate
Pronunciation: /ɪˈkweɪt
 
/

Definition of equate in English:

verb

[with object] (often equate something to/with)
1Consider (one thing) to be the same as or equivalent to another: customers equate their name with quality
More example sentences
  • Over the years, people have come to equate his name with evil.
  • Those who equate hunting foxes with abusing children reduce humanity to the moral equivalent of mice.
  • Branding means equating your name to a certain topic, product, or service.
Synonyms
regard as the same as, regard as identical to;
identify, liken to, compare;
bracket, class, associate, connect, pair, link, relate, ally, think of together, set side by side
1.1 [no object] (equate to/with) (Of one thing) be the same as or equivalent to (another): that sum equates to half a million pounds today
More example sentences
  • They add that this would equate to the equivalent output of ‘two average power stations’.
  • The charges I shall have to pay to park weekly will equate to almost the equivalent of a year's subscriptions to be a choir member.
  • Unions say the latest offer is a complex deal under which all workers would receive a lump sum in December equating to a 2.7 per cent rise for the six month-period from April to September.
Synonyms
correspond, be equivalent, amount;
equal, be the same as
1.2Cause (two or more things) to be the same in quantity or value: the level of prices will move to equate supply and demand
More example sentences
  • Separately, the real risk-free rate is an equilibrium rate, equating the overall supply and demand for funds.
  • The price level - in the longer run - equates the demand for money to the supply.
  • The efficient amount of news coverage equates the value of the marginal story with the value of alternative uses of these resources.
Synonyms
equalize, balance, even out/up/off, level up/off, square, tally, match;
make equal, make even, make level, make equivalent, make identical, make the same, make uniform

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'make equal, balance'): from Latin aequat- 'made level or equal', from the verb aequare, from aequus (see equal). Current senses date from the mid 19th century.

Derivatives

equatable

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • There are some talented people that are equatable.
  • It has, to some extent, been reconcentrated in Israel (but cookery in that country is not equatable with Jewish cookery as it comprises other elements also).
  • There is no question that the West, by an accident of geography the ‘dominant’ culture, is easily equatable with modernity.

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