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esteem

Line breaks: es¦teem
Pronunciation: /ɪˈstiːm
 
, ɛ-/

Definition of esteem in English:

noun

[mass noun]
Respect and admiration: he was held in high esteem by colleagues
More example sentences
  • Matthew is held in great affection and esteem by public servants across Australia as well as in Canberra for his tireless work on their behalf.
  • At a time when Westminster has never been lower in public esteem, parliament needs an honest broker who commands respect from all sides.
  • He had a great personality and was held in high esteem by the public as he daily made sure the roads and footpaths were clean and tidy.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Respect and admire: many of these qualities are esteemed by managers (as adjective, with submodifier esteemed) a highly esteemed scholar
More example sentences
  • At that point, some might even label these esteemed legal scholars lunatics.
  • I have heard esteemed constitutional law scholars make this argument as well.
  • Gemstones are minerals esteemed for their qualities of beauty, durability, and rarity.
Synonyms
respect, admire, value, regard, hold in (high) regard, think (highly) of, acclaim, approve of, appreciate, like, prize, treasure, favour, recognize, venerate, hold in awe, look up to, revere, reverence, honour, praise, adulate, extol, pay homage to
2 formal Consider; deem: [with two objects]: I should esteem it a favour if you could speak to them
More example sentences
  • We esteem it a privilege to have had her with us here.
  • I would esteem it a favour if you would accept these two photos.
  • Most of the greatest minds in history belonged to those who were esteemed to be mentally unstable.
Synonyms
consider, regard as, deem, hold to be, think, think of as, reckon, count, account, believe, judge, adjudge, rate, class as, gauge, look on as, view as, see as, interpret as

Origin

Middle English (as a noun in the sense 'worth, reputation'): from Old French estime (noun), estimer (verb), from Latin aestimare 'to estimate'. The verb was originally in the Latin sense, also 'appraise' (compare with estimate), used figuratively to mean 'assess the merit of'. Current senses date from the 16th century.

Definition of esteem in:

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