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ethnography

Line breaks: eth|nog¦raphy
Pronunciation: /ɛθˈnɒɡrəfi
 
/

Definition of ethnography in English:

noun

[mass noun]
The scientific description of peoples and cultures with their customs, habits, and mutual differences.
Example sentences
  • This book is an important contribution to Melanesian ethnography and anthropology.
  • We have so much yet to learn from anthropology and ethnography, cognitive psychology, and, yes, even graphic art.
  • He supported research not only in the natural sciences, but also in anthropology and ethnography.

Derivatives

ethnographer

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Ad agencies are hiring anthropologists and ethnographers to study and film consumers in their natural environments to see what they really eat, drink, and buy.
  • He is always at pains to point out that the English terms and categories used by ethnographers do not necessarily reflect adequately the ways Polynesians themselves categorised their world.
  • Many ethnographers have noted the importance of food and drink for maintaining familiar forms and social networks among immigrant populations.

ethnographic

2
Pronunciation: /-nəˈɡrafɪk/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Although she calls this an ethnography, she eschews the usual ethnographic focus on culture, values and norms.
  • One such contribution from Furniss is her ethnographic approach to the study of the non-indigenous population.
  • The book is remarkably rich in ethnographic detail, but the lack of an index makes extracting it more difficult.

ethnographical

3
Pronunciation: /-nəˈɡrafɪk(ə)l/
adjective
Example sentences
  • The book has certainly achieved its goal of showing the spectrum of China's social, cultural, geographical, ethnographical and linguistic variety.
  • He followed this with a biography of his father-in-law Julius Agricola and an ethnographical account of the German tribes.
  • As the make-up of America keeps changing in ways no one could have expected 100 years ago, there is a need for more ethnographical information, particularly that relates to the cultures of native Americans and recent immigrants.

ethnographically

4
adverb
Example sentences
  • But a more ethnographically detailed examination of protests about environmental damage often reveals complex and contradictory political responses.
  • Overall, this is a stimulating and significant volume, both theoretically and ethnographically.
  • Hartley Fort is also positioned along a major ethnographically documented east-west transportation route across northern Iowa from the Mississippi Valley to Missouri River valley via the Big Sioux River in northwest Iowa.

Definition of ethnography in:

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