Definition of exaggerate in English:

exaggerate

Line breaks: ex|ag¦ger|ate
Pronunciation: /ɪgˈzadʒəreɪt
 
, ɛg-/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

exaggeratedly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Sitting in the office where he has been busily preparing to lead election-night coverage, he is clearly fired up by an otherwise uninspiring campaign, chuckling, giggling, contriving exaggeratedly actorish expressions.
  • You'll all be happy to know that I escaped my self-made prison without too much trouble, although I nearly slipped and fell when I tried to make an exaggeratedly large step well over the possible height of any of my candles.
  • After returning across the bridge, she shed her veils, exaggeratedly made-up her face and disappeared among the pedestrians travelling south along the waterfront.

exaggerative

Pronunciation: /-rətɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • There have been movie - makers who have stepped out of the realms of exaggerative patriotism and have dared to show America and its people for what they really are.
  • I must admit even though I am on the receiving end of all this exaggerative policing, I am grateful for the sense of safety it promotes.
  • You have an overly exaggerative imagination.

exaggerator

noun
More example sentences
  • May you survive the tempests that you are tempting, angering that the ungodly tribe of fibbers, exaggerators and outrageous abusers of power to bludgeon the real number.
  • I've gone through the claims and counter-claims, and suspect he was valiant in one incident and a whiner or exaggerator in others.
  • But the fact that he's a serial exaggerator is exactly why this story should receive attention, not why it should be shrugged off.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin exaggerat- 'heaped up', from the verb exaggerare, from ex- 'thoroughly' + aggerare 'heap up' (from agger 'heap'). The word originally meant 'pile up, accumulate', later 'intensify praise or blame', giving rise to current senses.

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