Definition of exhort in English:

exhort

Line breaks: ex¦hort
Pronunciation: /ɪgˈzɔːt
 
, ɛg-/

verb

[with object and infinitive]
Strongly encourage or urge (someone) to do something: I exhorted her to be a good child [with direct speech]: ‘Come on, you guys,’ exhorted Linda
More example sentences
  • He lauded the school for encouraging sports and exhorted young sportsmen to make strides in sports and academics.
  • The counsellor exhorts him to unswervingly stick to his ART regimen along with a rich, nutritional diet.
  • To get workers charged up, he exhorts his troops to act like entrepreneurs, take risks, and own up to failure quickly.
Synonyms
urge, encourage, call on, enjoin, adjure, charge, try to persuade, press, pressure, put pressure on, use pressure on, pressurize, lean on, push; egg on, spur, incite, goad; bid, appeal to, entreat, implore, beseech; advise, counsel, admonish, warn

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French exhorter or Latin exhortari, from ex- 'thoroughly' + hortari 'encourage'.

Derivatives

exhortative

Pronunciation: /-tətɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • He described Divine Beauty as ‘neither philosophy nor theology, neither spiritual nor doctrinal, neither critical nor exhortative but rather a delighted dance of all these elements’.
  • My problem with today's liturgical bureaucracy is that it advances measurable technical goals at the same time it diminishes the more essential immeasurable exhortative ones at the heart of EACW.
  • Here, the voice is not imperative, and it does not try to address the viewer directly; rather, it is exhortative, and it implicitly addresses, in plain Italian, the Italian team.

exhortatory

Pronunciation: /-tət(ə)ri/
adjective
More example sentences
  • There also is some superficial similarity with eugenicism in terms of an exhortatory jargon for human self-improvement, but I wouldn't press this point.
  • The President, we should note, is pretty much the only orator still using the exhortatory imperative form favoured by the Emperor Augustus and the other great chiefs of Roman history.
  • It is, of its nature, penal rather than exhortatory.

exhorter

noun
More example sentences
  • During the 18th century, John Wesley became a a fervent exhorter of work.
  • In addition to ministers, many Baptist churches had ruling elders, assistants, exhorters, deacons, deaconesses, elderesses, and evangelists.
  • In Delaware, Allen also encountered exhorters of the Methodist Society, then still affiliated with the Church of England.

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