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expiate

Line breaks: ex¦pi|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈɛkspɪeɪt
 
/

Definition of expiate in English:

verb

[with object]
Make amends or reparation for (guilt or wrongdoing): their sins must be expiated by sacrifice
More example sentences
  • I agree with you David, and I think this is the way that he deals with his problems, and in fact the way he expiates his guilt.
  • Founded exactly 25 years ago, this group of ostentatious do-gooders vow ‘to promulgate universal joy and expiate stigmatic guilt’.
  • This is not simply the story of a gentle, deluded old man whose attempts to expiate his guilt were poorly judged.
Synonyms
atone for, make amends for, make up for, do penance for, pay for, redress, redeem, offset, square, make good, make redress for, make reparation for, make recompense for, make restitution for, purge

Origin

late 16th century (in the sense 'end (rage, sorrow, etc.) by suffering it to the full'): from Latin expiat- 'appeased by sacrifice', from the verb expiare, from ex- 'out' + piare (from pius 'pious').

Derivatives

expiable

1
Pronunciation: /ˈɛkspɪəb(ə)l/
adjective

expiator

2
noun
Example sentences
  • He accepts the idea that he is to be the expiator for the damage done by mercantile capitalism.

expiatory

3
Pronunciation: /ˈɛkspɪət(ə)ri, ˌɛkspɪˈeɪt(ə)ri/
adjective
Example sentences
  • In an expiatory sacrifice the blood which is shed is regarded as wiping out a transgression.
  • Any expiatory rite is focused on the human predicament - on the problem of sin or cultic impurity.
  • Accordingly, he sees storytelling festivals as large expiatory and redemptory rituals of an almost religious kind.

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Pronunciation: ɪnˈɡreɪʃɪeɪt
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