Definition of extraordinary in English:

extraordinary

Line breaks: extra|or¦din|ary
Pronunciation: /ɪkˈstrɔːd(ə)n(ə)ri
 
, ɛk-, ˌɛkstrəˈɔːdɪn(ə)ri
 
/

adjective

  • 2 [attributive] (Of a meeting) specially convened: an extraordinary session of the Congress
    More example sentences
    • Immediately after the public meeting, Durrington parish council convened an extraordinary meeting and voted to oppose the English Heritage application.
    • A move to dissolve the society and distribute assets was defeated at an extraordinary meeting convened by Mr Kelly in July that year.
    • The prince also said he will convene an extraordinary session if it is necessary to finalize the bill.
  • 2.1 [postpositive] (Of an official) specially employed in addition to the usual staff: an Ambassador Extraordinary
    More example sentences
    • It states that the Ambassador Extraordinary was "considerably astonished" to be called upon to pay 600 francs for the hire of carriages.
    • This Ambassador extraordinary was issued a red (diplomatic) passport as well.

noun

(usually extraordinaries) Back to top  
  • An item in a company’s accounts not arising from its normal activities. Compare with exceptional.
    More example sentences
    • Of the total "army extraordinaries" of £315,917 submitted to the House of Commons on February 6, 1767, only £111,287 had arisen from North America.
    • Companies reporting profits before extraordinaries for several continuing years can suddenly tail spin to wipe out its entire capital and accumulated profits.

Derivatives

extraordinarily

adverb
[as submodifier]: an extraordinarily beautiful girl
More example sentences
  • A few years ago he had a moment with an extraordinarily beautiful woman in a bar, and she fell for him entirely.
  • Life can be extraordinarily beautiful and it's just a case of choosing to see that.
  • A prodigy is an individual who capitalizes on a unique talent at an extraordinarily young age.

extraordinariness

noun
More example sentences
  • This doesn't mean there's no room for extraordinariness in some capacity, but some parenting books do contribute to a kind of hysteria.
  • John seemed the least harmed of the three famous brothers, but he was still prevented from taking an ordinary place in life, compelled to impress his extraordinariness in his work.
  • Driven by the desire to be remembered for their extraordinariness, people go to absurd lengths to see their names in print to achieve some measure of immortality.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin extraordinarius, from extra ordinem 'outside the normal course of events'.

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