Definition of fabric in English:

fabric

Line breaks: fab¦ric
Pronunciation: /ˈfabrɪk
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1Cloth produced by weaving or knitting textile fibres: heavy cream fabric [count noun]: stretch fabrics
More example sentences
  • Lovely silk brocades and other fine fabrics are woven, dyed and embroidered here.
  • The use of fabrics such as Thai silk, fur and stretch cotton brings diversity to the texture.
  • I love the feel of natural fabrics; linen and silk are more lively and natural as well.
Synonyms
2The walls, floor, and roof of a building: decay and neglect are slowly eating away at the building’s fabric
More example sentences
  • Wet rot in the attic and upper floors is eating into the timber, plaster and fabric of the building and causing part of the roof to collapse.
  • The listing of the 45 ft former windmill is intended to protect the entire fabric of the building inside and out.
  • Bradford Council says that it cannot afford to do the necessary repairs to the building and its fabric but surely it has spare cash.
Synonyms
2.1The body of a car or aircraft: we heard creaking and rushing noises in the car’s fabric
More example sentences
  • An examination of the aircraft's fabric after the accident revealed that the paint covering on the fuselage and part of the tail was thicker than that on the wings.
  • The wing spars and ribs are made of extruded aluminum and the complete aircraft is covered with Ceconite fabric.
2.2The basic structure of a society, culture, activity, etc. the multicultural fabric of Canadian society
More example sentences
  • Instead he began to explore the social and cultural fabric of precolonial African societies.
  • It is time to say enough is enough before the unique fabric of this multicultural society is destroyed by the enemies within.
  • Aids has devastated the social and economic fabric of African societies and made orphans of a whole generation of children.

Origin

late 15th century: from French fabrique, from Latin fabrica 'something skilfully produced', from faber 'worker in metal, stone, etc.' The word originally denoted a building, later a machine, the general sense being 'something made', hence sense 1 (mid 18th century, originally denoting any manufactured material). sense 2 dates from the mid 17th century.

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict