There are 5 definitions of fell in English:

fell1

Line breaks: fell
Pronunciation: /fɛl
 
/
Past of fall.

Definition of fell in:

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Word of the day meretricious
Pronunciation: ˌmɛrɪˈtrɪʃəs
adjective
apparently attractive but having no real value...

There are 5 definitions of fell in English:

fell2

Line breaks: fell
Pronunciation: /fɛl
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Cut down (a tree): 33 million trees are felled each day
More example sentences
  • Up on a ridge to the right of us, someone has been felling an oak tree all day.
  • He said about two-acres of mature, ash, sycamore copper beech and oak trees were felled.
  • Is it true that as many as 150 Douglas Fir trees were felled?
Synonyms
1.1Knock down: Whitlock felled him with one punch
More example sentences
  • In a village near Varna, the wind felled an unfinished wall, which reduced an old house to debris as it fell, said the Civil Defence.
  • The wind then felled it to the ground and it landed on top of a cabin, which contained valuable equipment, and a surrounding fence.
  • Thousands of residents, predominantly those already living in poverty, are now homeless after their communities were felled by the winds.
Synonyms
knock down, knock over, knock to the ground, bowl over, strike down, bring down, bring to the ground, rugby-tackle, topple, ground, prostrate, catch off balance; knock out, knock unconscious; kill, cut down, mow down, pick off, shoot down, gun down, blast
2 (also flat-fell) Stitch down (the edge of a seam) to lie flat: (as adjective flat-felled) a flat-felled seam
More example sentences
  • A rubber mallet is surprisingly useful in flattening seams or hems on thick fabric or leather and especially on heavy flat-fell seams.
  • Continue around the pockets, trimming away the thicker layers and flat-fell seams.
  • Sew your seams the usual way, finish the raw edges with the serger or zigzag, press to one side, switch to top-stitching thread in the needle, and top-stitch the seams on the outside to resemble flat-felled seams.

noun

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An amount of timber cut.

Origin

Old English fellan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vellen and German fällen, also to fall.

Definition of fell in:

There are 5 definitions of fell in English:

fell3

Line breaks: fell
Pronunciation: /fɛl
 
/

noun

A hill or stretch of high moorland, especially in northern England: [in place names]: Cross Fell
More example sentences
  • On the tops the wind blew hard but the air was clear and the views stretched far over the fells and deep into the valleys.
  • Her work is influenced by the landscape, particularly the northern fells and colourful panoramas of foreign climes.
  • This flora of the fells is found in upland pastures, on barren and dry soil, in heathland and on ledges.

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse fjall, fell 'hill'; probably related to German Fels 'rock'.

Definition of fell in:

There are 5 definitions of fell in English:

fell4

Line breaks: fell
Pronunciation: /fɛl
 
/

adjective

literary
Of terrible evil or ferocity; deadly: the fell disease that was threatening her sister
More example sentences
  • Sometimes, the wind also brought unnervingly fell sounds with it, as if a chorus of unholy demons was singing in the distance.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fel, nominative of felon 'wicked (person)' (see felon1).

Phrases

in (or at) one fell swoop

All in one go: in one fell swoop they exceeded the total number of tries scored last year
[from Shakespeare's Macbeth ( iv. iii. 219)]
More example sentences
  • Freedom and privacy rarely, if ever, disappear in one fell swoop.
  • And in one fell swoop, all the things I had to remember her by were gone.
  • In one fell swoop fuel has been added to the fire of community disillusion with its political appointees.
Synonyms

Definition of fell in:

There are 5 definitions of fell in English:

fell5

Line breaks: fell
Pronunciation: /fɛl
 
/

noun

archaic
An animal’s hide or skin with its hair.

Origin

Old English fel, fell, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vel and German Fell, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin pellis and Greek pella 'skin'.

Definition of fell in: