Definition of feuilleton in English:

feuilleton

Line breaks: feuille|ton
Pronunciation: /ˈfəːɪtɒ̃
 
/

noun

1A part of a newspaper or magazine devoted to fiction, criticism, or light literature: her sharp wit has made her one of Russia’s masters of the literary feuilleton
More example sentences
  • The public showed an increasing appetite for light essays, character sketches, vignettes and urban panoramas, which were to be found on the back pages, or feuilletons, of daily journals and magazines.
  • The feuilleton film critics were unanimously pleased that the Golden Palm at Cannes went to Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne.
  • It's true, you can get this stuff in the US (for example, if you subscribe to The New York Review of Books) but I'd rather get a newspaper that comes with a real feuilleton.
1.1An article printed in a feuilleton.
More example sentences
  • Roth was a master of the feuilleton, or think piece, which held an honoured place in the pages of Europe's great newspapers during the 20th century.
  • Et voila, this halo of glory has evaporated before the indifference of the crowd; it's annoying, especially when one has gone to such trouble and expense to construct one's success out of the praise of newspaper feuilletons.
  • The narrator in the urban nineteenth-century Russian novel is likewise informed by a coupling of the Russian chronicle tradition with the Parisian physiological sketch, filtering via the feuilleton into the serialized novel.

Origin

mid 19th century: French, from feuillet, diminutive of feuille 'leaf'.

Definition of feuilleton in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day humoresque
Pronunciation: ˌhjuːməˈrɛsk
noun
a short, lively piece of music