Definition of fictitious in English:

fictitious

Line breaks: fic|ti¦tious
Pronunciation: /fɪkˈtɪʃəs
 
/

adjective

1Not real or true; imaginary or fabricated: reports of a deal were dismissed as fictitious by the Minister
More example sentences
  • This must be a real, not a fictitious, intention, so it hardly arises in the case of a fraudster.
  • Ms Moore, the department and Downing Street issued blanket denials, claiming the e-mail was fabricated and fictitious.
  • Better to discover how science is in fact developed and learned than to fabricate a fictitious structure to a similar effect.
Synonyms
false, fake, counterfeit, fabricated, sham; untrue, bogus, spurious, assumed, affected, adopted, feigned, invented, made up, concocted, improvised
informal pretend, phoney
British informal , dated cod
2Occurring in or invented for fiction.
More example sentences
  • The Curmudgeon is a satirical column based on fictitious characters in a mythical village.
  • It is about a West Coast Rugby team full of larger than life fictitious characters.
  • For the first time, the Indian Postal Services Department has issued a stamp on a fictitious character.
Synonyms
fictional, imaginary, imagined, invented, made up, make-believe, unreal, non-existent, mythical, storybook, apocryphal; fabricated, concocted, devised; the product of someone's imagination, a figment of someone's imagination

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin ficticius (from fingere 'contrive, form') + -ous (see also -itious2).

Derivatives

fictitiously

adverb
More example sentences
  • And there's even evidence that some of them have gotten a degree and then gone to their employer and had their employer pay them back for tuition that they've spent, again, fictitiously.
  • Petrov, who was the commander of a flight in which 500 large packages of cigarettes were fictitiously exported to Greece, was charged with smuggling and held in custody.
  • Now well into its second season, Spooks has managed to attract the kind of attention that is usually reserved for the real life events that it fictitiously depicts.

fictitiousness

noun
More example sentences
  • ‘There is no such thing as a work of pure factuality,’ writes Janet Malcolm, ‘any more than there is one of pure fictitiousness.’
  • As Hackett feels obliged to point out to the Endons, ‘I am scarcely the outer world’ thus ironically disputing a qualitative difference between different levels of fictitiousness within a work of fiction.
  • While Marvell, Browning, Eliot, etc. had based the genre of lyric around exploring the self-as-structure (its fictitiousness, its layeredness), poets were often being paid well to take the self seriously as an essential whole.

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Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected