There are 4 definitions of flake in English:

flake1

Line breaks: flake
Pronunciation: /fleɪk
 
/

noun

  • 1A small, flat, very thin piece of something, typically one which has broken away or been peeled off from a larger piece: he licked the flakes of croissant off his finger
    More example sentences
    • She was tearing fragments off and placing them in her mouth, dusty and moist, her fingers covered in oil from the almond paste, sugar and flakes of croissant pastry.
    • In this method, clear sticky tape was pressed firmly into sample areas and rapidly pulled away, removing thin flakes of biotite with the tapes.
    • There were also large flakes of paint peeling off of the buildings, though it was hard to tell when there was no color to the whole place.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1A snowflake: the snow was coming down in thick flakes
    More example sentences
    • Outside, snow fell: fat flakes adhering to the windows and frosting the glass in translucent white.
    • And the snow flurries quickly became a constant storm of thick flakes that started to settle deeply on the ground.
    • A soft haze of thick flakes, sluicing through the streetlights, settling on gutters, bicycles and pedestrians.
  • 1.2 Archaeology A piece of hard stone chipped off for use as a tool by prehistoric humans: [as modifier]: flake tools
    More example sentences
    • Living on the Isle of Wight with a life-long interest in prehistory I have spent many hours field-walking and have a substantial collection of flint tools and flakes.
    • The flake tools have possible polishing and edge-wear damage evident along one lateral margin.
    • The artifacts include hundreds of stone tools and flakes, as well as spear foreshafts made of rhinoceros horn and mammoth tusk.
  • 1.3 [mass noun] Thin pieces of crushed, dried food or bait for fish.
    More example sentences
    • I decided to use a nice piece of bread flake as hook bait.
    • When trotting with a pin in fast water, I often use bread flake as my hook bait.
    • The water certainly was not very deep so I decided to use a small self cocking float with 6 lb line and a piece of bread flake as bait.
  • 2North American informal A crazy or eccentric person.
    More example sentences
    • So, do you now blame your loss on these crazies and flakes?

verb

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  • 1 [no object] Come or fall away from a surface in flakes: the paint had been flaking off for years
    More example sentences
    • The rusty pink nail polish that I had put on two months ago was flaking off and falling silently on the ground.
    • The surface of the tree was flaking off in great sheets of bark, showering the two with dust made of both dead tree and stone.
    • Today, at 108,000 kilometres, there's paint flaking off the leading edge of the hood, the brakes need work and the dashboard makes a buzzing noise at highway speeds when it's cold.
  • 1.1Lose small fragments from the surface: my nails have started to flake at the ends
  • 2 [with object] Separate (food) into flakes or thin pieces: (as adjective flaked) flaked almonds
    More example sentences
    • Beware of foods such as hash browns, home fries, jam, molasses, soup mixes, canned vegetables, wine and flaked coconut.
    • I've switched to flaked coconut and it works just as well.
    • Dissolve 6 tablespoons flaked pickling salt in 1 gallon of lukewarm water.
  • 2.1 [no object] (Of food) come apart in flakes or thin pieces: cook until the fish flakes easily
    More example sentences
    • Place on greased baking sheet and bake at 450F turning once for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden and fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.
    • The kind where the crust flakes off in sharp little pieces that stick to the roof of our mouth.
    • Add salmon, skinside down, and cook, covered, 10-12 minutes or until fish flakes easily.

Origin

Middle English: the immediate source is unknown, the senses perhaps deriving from different words; probably of Germanic origin and related to flag2 and flaw1.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kəːf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 4 definitions of flake in English:

flake2

Line breaks: flake
Pronunciation: /fleɪk
 
/

noun

  • A rack or shelf for storing or drying food such as fish.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a wicker hurdle): perhaps of Scandinavian origin and related to Old Norse flaki, fleki 'wicker shield' and Danish flage 'hurdle'.

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Definition of flake in:

There are 4 definitions of flake in English:

flake3

Line breaks: flake
Pronunciation: /fleɪk
 
/

verb

[no object] (flake out) • informal

Origin

late 15th century (in the senses 'become languid' and (of a garment) 'fall in folds'): variant of obsolete flack and the verb flag4. The current sense dates from the 1940s.

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There are 4 definitions of flake in English:

flake4

Line breaks: flake
Pronunciation: /fleɪk
 
/
(also fake /feɪk/)
Nautical

noun

  • A single turn of a coiled rope or hawser.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Lay (a rope) in loose coils in order to prevent it tangling: a cable had to be flaked out
  • 1.1Lay (a sail) down in folds either side of the boom.
    More example sentences
    • Going to the mizzen boom he undid the badly fastened ties, raised the sail and lowered it, flaking it neatly as it came down.

Origin

early 17th century (as a noun): of unknown origin; compare with German Flechte in the same sense.

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