There are 2 main definitions of flex in English:

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flex1

Line breaks: flex
Pronunciation: /flɛks
 
/

verb

1(With reference to a limb or joint) bend or become bent: [with object]: she saw him flex his ankle and wince [no object]: it’s important to prevent the damaged wrist from flexing
More example sentences
  • All these bones articulate with other bones and are able to make tiny interdependent movements, as well as bend or flex themselves.
  • Over the last few days I've been thinking about all the things I won't be able to do with the limb; flex my ankle, wiggle my toes, point my foot left and right.
  • As you flex your ankles, knees and hips, the angle of your front shin with the ground should match the angle of your spine with the ground.
Synonyms
1.1 [with object] Cause (a muscle) to stand out by contracting or tensing it: a group of bodybuilders flexed their muscles
More example sentences
  • They stood before them, flexing their godly muscles.
  • But it is eerily impressive, like watching a brilliant young bodybuilder flexing his steroidal muscles.
  • Loveable cartoon character Popeye always flexes his biceps when he wants to show off his muscles.
Synonyms
tighten, tauten, make taut, tense (up), tension, contract, stiffen, brace, knot
1.2 [no object] (Of a muscle) contract or be tensed: a muscle flexed in his jaw
More example sentences
  • End the movement with the dumbbell over your upper chest and with your pec muscles flexed as hard as possible.
  • He was still standing there when she went back into her room, his arms crossed, the thick muscles of his biceps flexing.
  • Jim's jaw muscle flexed and he continued to unwrap the shirt bits from Blair's arm.
1.3 [no object] (Of a material) be capable of warping or bending and then reverting to shape: set windows in rubber so they flex during an earthquake
More example sentences
  • Over time, as the boot leather flexes, stiffness decreases.
  • An experienced player can tell by the stick's vibration whether or not the stick flexes too much.
  • A collective puff of expelled breath flexed through the courtyard, liberated pirates rubbing their eyes to be certain the welcome, if not morbid, sight was real.
2 (as adjective flexed) Archaeology Relating to or denoting a practice of burying a corpse with the legs drawn up under the chin.
Example sentences
  • They did, however, think the skeletons looked very unusual, being very highly flexed, like Peruvian mummies.
  • Despite the length of the pit, the proximity of these articulated extremities and the ilium shows that the primary burial was in a flexed position prior to disturbance.
  • Some adults and children were subject to secondary processing after initial burial in flexed or extended positions in pits located inside the house.

Origin

early 16th century: from Latin flex- 'bent', from the verb flectere.

More
  • This comes from the Latin flectere ‘to bend’. The electrical flex (early 20th century) is a shortening of flexible cord or cable, flexible being late Middle English and from the same source, as is deflect (mid 16th century) ‘bend away’. An inflection (Late Middle English) was originally an act of bending inwards, gaining its grammatical sense in the mid 17th century. Flexitime has been being worked, by those lucky enough to get it, since the 1970s.

Phrases

flex one's muscles

1
see muscle.

Words that rhyme with flex

annex, convex, ex, hex, perplex, Rex, sex, specs, Tex, Tex-Mex, vex

Definition of flex in:

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There are 2 main definitions of flex in English:

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flex2

Line breaks: flex
Pronunciation: /flɛks
 
/

noun

British
A flexible insulated cable used for carrying electric current to an appliance.
Example sentences
  • Reading Crown Court was told that she took an electric flex intending to throttle the ripper.
  • They had tied an electrical flex around the door to stop anyone entering.
  • There was an electrical flex across the landing and the girl could have easily fallen down the stairs.
Synonyms
cable, wire, lead, extension;
North American cord

Origin

early 20th century: abbreviation of flexible.

More
  • This comes from the Latin flectere ‘to bend’. The electrical flex (early 20th century) is a shortening of flexible cord or cable, flexible being late Middle English and from the same source, as is deflect (mid 16th century) ‘bend away’. An inflection (Late Middle English) was originally an act of bending inwards, gaining its grammatical sense in the mid 17th century. Flexitime has been being worked, by those lucky enough to get it, since the 1970s.

Definition of flex in:

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