Definition of formidable in English:

formidable

Line breaks: for¦mid|able
Pronunciation: /ˈfɔːmɪdəb(ə)l
 
, fɔːˈmɪd-/

adjective

Derivatives

formidableness

noun
More example sentences
  • Phillips recreates each of the great eras of wine consumption, with their very different values and palates, and vividly conveys the sheer formidableness of much that has been drunk and enjoyed.
  • The expansion of the domestic markets and the very large-scale integration effected by technology-savvy institutions give Mumbai a formidableness that other cities in Asia and Australia may envy.
  • Immediately this musty record of man's land lust assumes the formidableness of a battle - the quick struggling with the dust.

formidably

adverb
More example sentences
  • Okay, there are ‘free’ appetisers, a micro-course, coffee and petits fours, but with about 300 per cent mark-up on wine, you're contemplating a formidably expensive treat.
  • It's ridiculous that this President, who has proven himself a formidably talented debater, is scared to answer questions in anything remotely resembling an unpredictable environment.
  • But among the educated middle classes in India the knowledge of Shakespeare is formidably good, alarming really, because you find people who know the text as well as you do.

Origin

late Middle English: from French, or from Latin formidabilis, from formidare 'to fear'.

Usage

There are two possible pronunciations of formidable: one with the stress on the for- and the other with the stress on the -mid-. The second pronunciation is now common in British English, but the traditional pronunciation places the stress on the first syllable. Both pronunciations are acceptable in modern standard English.

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