Definition of freedom in English:

freedom

Line breaks: free|dom
Pronunciation: /ˈfriːdəm
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1The power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants: we do have some freedom of choice [count noun]: he talked of revoking some of the freedoms
More example sentences
  • As usual, those in the pay of the pesticide industry presume to speak on behalf of freedom of choice and a balanced approach.
  • Violence or intimidation against the media could hamper press freedom and eventually deprive the public of its right to information.
  • In recent years, examples of media abuses of press freedom have been common.
Synonyms
1.1Absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government: he was a champion of Irish freedom
More example sentences
  • Quite a powerful speech, especially the last part on foreign policy and freedom.
  • Lawlessness is arriving as a domestic and foreign assault on legal ideas that endorse freedom and human rights.
  • The struggle cannot be separated from the struggle for freedom of despotism of all kinds.
Synonyms
independence, self-government, self-determination, self-legislation, self rule, home rule, sovereignty, autonomy, autarky, democracy; self-sufficiency, individualism, separation, non-alignment; emancipation, enfranchisement
historical manumission
1.2The power of self-determination attributed to the will; the quality of being independent of fate or necessity.
More example sentences
  • Conferences of philosophers on determinism and freedom aren't the same as they used to be.
  • For Sartre the necessity of freedom is paramount in his thinking.
  • Kant's attempt to reconcile determinism and freedom involves placing us in two different realms.
Synonyms
2The state of not being imprisoned or enslaved: the shark thrashed its way to freedom
More example sentences
  • That busy line must be a cruel and tantalising reminder of lost freedom for the inmates of the upstate New York penitentiary.
  • As with Mexican legal support for slavery, actual military policy did not consistently grant freedom to the enslaved.
  • Black sailors helped runaways stow-away to freedom, risking imprisonment to challenge slavery.
Synonyms
2.1The state of being unrestricted and able to move easily: the shorts have a side split for freedom of movement
More example sentences
  • The goal for her is to be able to gain enough freedom of movement so that she can throw her feet up to the left and away from the attacker's body.
  • Free-range hens, for instance, have greater freedom to move about, but are more susceptible to feather pecking and disease.
  • While clever enough in theory, the chairs in reality clutter the stage and restrict the cast's sorely needed freedom to move.
2.2Unrestricted use of something: the dog has the freedom of the house when we are out
More example sentences
  • Their 100 guests will have freedom of the house and garden for the rest of the day.
  • Because the entire school is rarely more than 60, it is common for children to have the freedom of the whole building and be in touch with all the staff.
  • We kept chickens which had the freedom of the garden - free range par excellence!
3 (freedom from) The state of not being subject to or affected by (something undesirable): government policies to achieve freedom from want
More example sentences
  • India won its freedom from colonial rule, ending nearly 200 years of British rule.
  • A question of an individual's freedom from unlawful detention is always serious.
  • Celebrate your freedom from the technological yokes of modern life.
Synonyms
exemption, immunity, dispensation, exception, exclusion, release, relief, reprieve, absolution, exoneration; impunity
informal letting off, a let-off
4 (the freedom of ——) British A special privilege or right of access, especially that of full citizenship of a city granted to a public figure as an honour: he accepted the freedom of the City of Glasgow
More example sentences
  • It was the warship's first return home since it had been granted the freedom of the city six years earlier.
  • During the brief service he said he was ‘deeply touched and honoured to received the freedom of the city’.
  • He set up a charity for unemployed teenagers in Liverpool, and was recently honoured with the freedom of the city.
5 archaic Familiarity or openness in speech or behaviour.
More example sentences
  • They think that they can make themselves as agreeable to the men as their successful rivals, by adopting the same style and allowing the same freedom of conversation.
  • I talked a great deal to him with the freedom I have long used to him on this and on other subjects.
  • We were surprised to find an openness and freedom between us we hadn't experienced before.
Synonyms
naturalness, openness, lack of reserve/inhibition, casualness, informality, lack of ceremony, spontaneity, ingenuousnessimpudence; familiarity, overfamiliarity, presumption, forwardness
informal cheek

Origin

Old English frēodōm (see free, -dom).

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Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict