There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog1

Line breaks: frog
Pronunciation: /frɒg
 
/

noun

  • 1A tailless amphibian with a short squat body, moist smooth skin, and very long hind legs for leaping.
    • Frogs are found in most families of the order Anura, but the ‘true frogs’ are confined to the large family Ranidae, which includes the European common frog (Rana temporaria)
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    • Around 5,000 amphibian species, including frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders are thought to exist today.
    • Some amphibians we know today include frogs, toads, newts and salamanders.
    • A similar story can be told for several other species of toads, frogs, salamanders, alligators, and turtles around the world.
  • 2 (Frog) informal , • derogatory A French person.
    More example sentences
    • Can the Boks lift themselves to beat the French or will the Frogs with their typical flair pull a fast one on us?
    • Let him give the people of Britain a crack at the enemy for whom our visceral antipathy has never abated - the snail-guzzling, effete, gesticulating, garlic-exhaling Frogs.
    • The British media are now too busy bashing the Frogs.

Phrases

have a frog in one's throat

informal Lose one’s voice or find it hard to speak because of hoarseness.
More example sentences
  • It sounded as though she had a frog in her throat.
  • I have always had a frog in my throat but now I have a feeling like something is stuck in my throat.
  • When I left Freetown on the helicopter on the first leg of my trip home I had a frog in my throat.

Origin

Old English frogga, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vors and German Frosch. Used as a general term of abuse in Middle English, the term was applied specifically to the Dutch in the 17th century; its application to the French (late 18th century) is partly alliterative, partly from the reputation of the French for eating frogs' legs.

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Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmeɪlstrəm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea

There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog2

Line breaks: frog
Pronunciation: /frɒg
 
/

noun

  • 1A thing used to hold or fasten something, in particular:
    More example sentences
    • Sure, there are materials sold for that purpose, such as water-absorbing foam and metal pin holders, or frogs.
    • Some shovels have a plate welded over the frog to increase strength and keep the wooden handle drier and less prone to decay.
  • 1.1An ornamental coat fastener or braid consisting of a spindle-shaped button and a loop through which it passes.
    More example sentences
    • I wasn't exotic and I never thought about wearing a little black linen pants and a shirt that closed with frogs instead of buttons.
    • The costume was a very nice military top, green material with a frog or braid across the front, black wool tights with a red decoration on the side, and nice character shoes.
    • I know the braided loop on a traditional Asian costume is a frog.
  • 1.2An attachment to a belt for holding a sword, bayonet, or similar weapon.
  • 1.3A perforated or spiked device for holding the stems of flowers in an arrangement.
    More example sentences
    • Fill the cups with well-soaked floral foam or use a small metal florist's frog, if necessary, to hold the flowers in place.
  • 1.4The piece into which the hair is fitted at the lower end of the bow of a stringed instrument.
    More example sentences
    • In Renaissance Europe the stick became straighter, and a wooden frog was wedged between stick and hair to hold them apart at the heel.
    • Franchomme had a Stradivari cello but held the bow above the frog, making for flexibility and subtlety of tone rather than robustness.
  • 1.5A grooved metal plate for guiding the wheels of a railway vehicle at an intersection.
    More example sentences
    • If you stand close by the crossing, you can feel the ground shake as the wheels bang over the frogs.

Derivatives

frogging

noun
More example sentences
  • I turned round and there was a doorman, dressed in a green 18th-century coachman's coat with extra frogging.
  • He was facing her, no longer clad in the deep jacket with silver frogging, but now swathed in his trademark black cloak.
  • Saliva splattered onto his jacket and dripped down the lace and frogging.

Origin

early 18th century: perhaps a use of frog1, influenced by synonymous Italian forchetta or French fourchette 'small fork', because of the shape.

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Definition of frog in:

There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog3

Line breaks: frog
Pronunciation: /frɒɡ
 
/

noun

  • 1An elastic horny pad growing in the sole of a horse’s hoof, helping to absorb the shock when the hoof hits the ground.
    More example sentences
    • ‘The horse scraped the frog of his left hoof in the backstretch and lost his drive,’ Nakatani said.
    • The ground surface of the foot, that is the sole, bars and frog, are not touched.
    • ‘She has flat feet and her frogs have gotten beat up in the past, but her feet have been good lately,’ Hills said.
  • 1.1A raised or swollen area on a surface: a bulge or frog is formed on the front of the blade

Origin

early 17th century: perhaps from frog1; perhaps also influenced by Italian forchetta or French fourchette (see frog2).

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