Definition of fugitive in English:

fugitive

Line breaks: fu¦gi|tive
Pronunciation: /ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv
 
/

noun

A person who has escaped from captivity or is in hiding: fugitives from justice
More example sentences
  • I would rather die first, or become a fugitive from justice!
  • Now that she has become a fugitive from justice, the townspeople see an opportunity to exploit her.
  • He fled bail to become a fugitive from justice.
Synonyms

adjective

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Quick to disappear; fleeting: the fugitive effects of light a fugitive dye
More example sentences
  • In a second, and more fugitive image, the action opens with modern citizens struggling to be heard in the public arena.
  • It is another fugitive inscription on the page of earth that it is necessary to seize, that you want to understand.
  • We take a lot of measures to stop fugitive dust blow.
Synonyms
fleeting, transient, transitory, ephemeral, evanescent, flitting, flying, fading, momentary, short-lived, short, brief, passing, impermanent, fly-by-night, here today and gone tomorrow
literary fugacious

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French fugitif, -ive, from Latin fugitivus, from fugere 'flee'.

Definition of fugitive in:

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Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
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