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fungible

Line breaks: fun¦gible
Pronunciation: /ˈfʌn(d)ʒɪb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of fungible in English:

adjective

Law
(Of goods contracted for without an individual specimen being specified) replaceable by another identical item; mutually interchangeable.
Example sentences
  • One that acknowledges that my candidate's speech is mine, that hard money is fungible with soft money, and thus that both should be regulated the same way.
  • Some would argue that this is both pedantic and unrealistic, since money is fungible and one £10 note is for all purposes the same as another.
  • Most evidence suggests that aid money is fungible - that is, that it goes into the pot of public funds and is spent on whatever the recipient wants to spend it on.

Origin

late 17th century: from medieval Latin fungibilis, from fungi 'perform, enjoy', with the same sense as fungi vice 'serve in place of'.

Derivatives

fungibility

1
Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
Example sentences
  • But there is no obstacle in principle to finding a trust, despite the fungibility of its subject matter, so long as the intention to create a trust is clear.
  • Ultimately, the fungibility of money, and the ubiquity of the state in providing services and setting ground rules, together mean that there is no such thing as a ‘mere’ decision not to subsidize an activity.
  • But the fact of fungibility suggests that aid-giving could be greatly simplified if most took the form of unconditional balance-of-payments support.

Definition of fungible in:

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