Definition of fuss in English:

fuss

Line breaks: fuss
Pronunciation: /fʌs
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1A display of unnecessary or excessive excitement, activity, or interest: I don’t know what all the fuss is about
More example sentences
  • ‘There is no room in my life for drugs, fights, divorce, adultery, sadism, unnecessary fuss and sex,’ he says now.
  • That was the whole dream - no excitement, no fuss, no great drama.
  • She appeared bored, and I knew she thought I was making a lot of unnecessary fuss.
Synonyms
ado, excitement, agitation, uproar, to-do, stir, commotion, confusion, disturbance, tumult, hubbub, rigmarole, folderol, brouhaha, furore, storm in a teacup, much ado about nothing; upset, worry, bother, row; fluster, flurry, bustle
British informal carry-on, kerfuffle
North American informal fuss and feathers
literary pother
1.1 [in singular] A protest or dispute of a specified degree or kind: he didn’t put up too much of a fuss
More example sentences
  • People are forced to take to the streets, organise petitions, write letters and generally make a proper fuss in protest.
  • I strongly suspect, although I do not know, that most of the people kicking up the fuss are Protestant or Jewish.
  • Insiders revealed that the handsome star was left with no choice but to retract his complaint quickly returned to work without a fuss.
Synonyms
protest, complaint, objection; grumble, whine; tantrum, outburst, hysterics; commotion, trouble
informal grouse, gripe
1.2Elaborate or complex procedures; trouble or difficulty: they settled in with very little fuss
More example sentences
  • Trevor always made them feel welcome in his bank and sorted out their problems with the minimum of fuss, winning him many new and satisfied customers.
  • However, it is simple to mix and may conveniently be started the night before with a minimum of fuss needed to complete it the next day.
  • Basically, it does exactly what it says on the tin with the minimum of fuss and hassle.
Synonyms
bother, trouble, inconvenience, effort, exertion, labour
informal hassle

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1Show unnecessary or excessive concern about something: she’s always fussing about her food
More example sentences
  • He's a real pain because he's always fussing annoyingly about books and cars and his appearance, but my friends think he's cool.
  • My Aunt pointed out to me that we always fuss over Dad, but Mum's health isn't great, and it suffers along with my Dad's when something is wrong with him.
  • It's just that, because she's always been there; fussing and cleaning and polishing, I don't even think about what happens to those mud-stains.
Synonyms
worry, fret, be agitated, be worried, take pains, make a big thing out of; make a mountain out of a molehill
informal get worked up, be in a flap, flap, be in a tizzy, be in a stew, make a meal of, make a (big) thing of
1.1Busy oneself restlessly: beside him Kegan was fussing with sheets of paper
More example sentences
  • They fussed around, re-arranging the altar boys and plumping the bishops' cushions.
  • They fussed around, making sure we were comfortable, as we set to work on the red leather-bound menu.
  • I screamed and tried to fight, crying in frustration while doctors frantically fussed around me, shouting noises that echoed through my head.
Synonyms
1.2 [with object] British Disturb or bother (someone): when she cries in her sleep, try not to fuss her
More example sentences
  • It does not fuss me one way or tother, but if they are truly confidential I will want them uplifted and removed.
Synonyms
pester, disturb, harass; irritate, annoy, vex, bother, nag
informal hassle
1.3 [with object] Treat (someone) with excessive attention or affection: she flattered and fussed her
More example sentences
  • On his way back to the house he stopped by the barn to fuss the mother cat and introduce himself to the kittens.
  • Everyone on the show adores him and men and women were queuing up to fuss him.
  • Freya crouched down and fussed her, not minding her face being licked enthusiastically.

Origin

early 18th century: perhaps Anglo-Irish.

Phrases

make a fuss

Become angry and complain: I thought Mum might make a fuss but she was in a good mood she’d made a big fuss about not having a Brownie uniform
More example sentences
  • Because I then felt, as a result of making a fuss, or complaining, or wishing to seek that the situation be addressed, I then suffered victimisation.
  • ACT's response is that she shouldn't have made a fuss or complained, for fear of damaging the party.
  • If the bombing had happened in Liverpool the inhabitants would be out in the street, moaning and wailing and making a fuss.

make a fuss over (or British of)

Treat (a person or animal) with excessive attention or affection: their grandmother made such a fuss of them
More example sentences
  • Nor does he display too much affection or make a fuss over them.
  • ‘She's quiet and quite shy, and loves to be stroked and made a fuss of,’ said owner Margaret Brown.
  • I was thoroughly pampered and made a fuss of, and although I'm not quite sure how I got so lucky or deserving, I loved every minute of it.

Derivatives

fusser

noun
More example sentences
  • The tidiers, the cleaners, the fussers, the preeners - they are only running toward an early demise.
  • They have looked after all sorts of children: sniffers, fussers, sneaky and bad tempered ones.
  • Her approach to life is direct and she can also be pessimistic, critical and something of a fusser.

Definition of fuss in:

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