There are 3 main definitions of gage in English:

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gage 1

Line breaks: gage
Pronunciation: /ɡeɪdʒ/
archaic

noun

1A valued object deposited as a guarantee of good faith.
Example sentences
  • The same process, involving distraints and blockade, may be used not only in pleas begun by writ, but also in pleas begun by gage and pledge.
1.1A pledge, especially a glove, thrown down as a symbol of a challenge to fight.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Offer (an object or one’s life) as a guarantee of good faith: a guide sent to them by the headman of this place gaged his life as a forfeit if he failed

Origin

Middle English: from Old French gage (noun), gager (verb), of Germanic origin; related to wage and wed.

More
  • engage from Late Middle English:

    Gage is an old word that means ‘a valued object deposited as a guarantee of good faith’ and, as a verb, ‘to give as a pledge’. An Old French word related to wage (Middle English) and wedding ( see marry), it is the root of engage. Engage originally meant ‘give as a pledge’ and ‘pawn or mortgage’, later coming to express the ideas ‘to pledge or guarantee’ and ‘to enter into a contract’. People have been getting engaged to be married since the beginning of the 18th century: the first recorded example is by Henry Fielding ( 1707–54), author of Joseph Andrews and Tom Jones.

Words that rhyme with gage

age, assuage, backstage, cage, downstage, engage, enrage, gauge, mage, multistage, offstage, onstage, Osage, page, Paige, rage, rampage, sage, stage, swage, under-age, upstage, wage

Definition of gage in:

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There are 3 main definitions of gage in English:

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gage 2 Line breaks: gage

noun& verb

Variant spelling of gauge.

Definition of gage in:

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There are 3 main definitions of gage in English:

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gage 3 Line breaks: gage
Pronunciation: /ɡeɪdʒ/

noun

Another term for greengage.
Example sentences
  • For a crop of apples, pears, plums, damsons, gages or cherries, which are left outside all year round, try dwarf and pyramid fruit trees.
  • Thomas Rivers brought it to England where it became the seed of a worthy line of gages propagated in his nursery at Sawbridgeworth.

Origin

Mid 19th century: from the name of Sir William Gage (1657–1727), the English botanist who introduced it to England.

More
  • engage from Late Middle English:

    Gage is an old word that means ‘a valued object deposited as a guarantee of good faith’ and, as a verb, ‘to give as a pledge’. An Old French word related to wage (Middle English) and wedding ( see marry), it is the root of engage. Engage originally meant ‘give as a pledge’ and ‘pawn or mortgage’, later coming to express the ideas ‘to pledge or guarantee’ and ‘to enter into a contract’. People have been getting engaged to be married since the beginning of the 18th century: the first recorded example is by Henry Fielding ( 1707–54), author of Joseph Andrews and Tom Jones.

Definition of gage in:

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