There are 3 definitions of gage in English:

gage1

Line breaks: gage
Pronunciation: /geɪdʒ
 
/
archaic

noun

  • 1A valued object deposited as a guarantee of good faith.
    More example sentences
    • The same process, involving distraints and blockade, may be used not only in pleas begun by writ, but also in pleas begun by gage and pledge.
  • 1.1A pledge, especially a glove, thrown down as a symbol of a challenge to fight.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • Offer (an object or one’s life) as a guarantee of good faith: a guide sent to them by the headman of this place gaged his life as a forfeit if he failed

Origin

Middle English: from Old French gage (noun), gager (verb), of Germanic origin; related to wage and wed.

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Word of the day grotesquerie
Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively

There are 3 definitions of gage in English:

gage2

Line breaks: gage

noun & verb

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Definition of gage in:

There are 3 definitions of gage in English:

gage3

Line breaks: gage
Pronunciation: /geɪdʒ
 
/

noun

  • another term for greengage.
    More example sentences
    • For a crop of apples, pears, plums, damsons, gages or cherries, which are left outside all year round, try dwarf and pyramid fruit trees.
    • Thomas Rivers brought it to England where it became the seed of a worthy line of gages propagated in his nursery at Sawbridgeworth.

Origin

mid 19th century: from the name of Sir William Gage (1657–1727), the English botanist who introduced it to England.

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