Definition of galley in English:

galley

Line breaks: gal¦ley
Pronunciation: /ˈgali
 
/

noun (plural galleys)

  • 1 historical A low, flat ship with one or more sails and up to three banks of oars, chiefly used for warfare or piracy and often manned by slaves or criminals.
    More example sentences
    • The ship was a fast galley powered by three banks of rowers pulling up to 200 oars.
    • The primary warships during this period progressed gradually from oared galleys to sailing vessels.
    • It's the beat generation, it's be-at, it's the beat to keep, it's the beat of the heart, it's being beat and down in the world and like all time low-down, and like in ancient civilisations, the slave boatmen rowing galleys to a beat.
  • 1.1A large open rowing boat kept on a warship for use by the captain.
    More example sentences
    • Finally captured, the unknown galley's captain is about to be hung.
    • Unlike the fictional Robinson Crusoe, Selkirk had, at least initially, chosen his desert island over his privateer galley.
    • I had scarcely finished saying this when I saw white birds sweep down upon the enemy, and one of the galleys overturned, and all on board were drowned.
  • 2The kitchen in a ship or aircraft.
    More example sentences
    • Since it was a long-range aircraft, an efficient galley had to be designed and installed and this was placed behind the navigator's station and in front of the passenger compartment.
    • There are a navigation station and a quarter berth aft along the port side, and galley aft on the starboard side.
    • At the aft end of the cabin there is a port galley and starboard head.
  • 3 (also galley proof) A printer’s proof in the form of long single-column strips, not in sheets or pages.
    [galley from French galée denoting an oblong tray for holding set-up type]
    More example sentences
    • We'd write our marks on raw copy (type written on a page) until the pages were almost illegible, and then send it to be turned into a galley proof (one long line of printed up, typed up copy).
    • And it will happen in this, because stories look different at every stage along the way, from the manuscript to a galley to a page proof to the printed magazine.
    • Some manuscripts include rough and final drafts, and galley and page proofs.

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from medieval Latin galea, from medieval Greek galaia, of unknown origin.

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