Share this entry

Share this page

gladiator

Line breaks: gladi|ator
Pronunciation: /ˈɡladɪeɪtə
 
/

Definition of gladiator in English:

noun

(In ancient Rome) a man trained to fight with weapons against other men or wild animals in an arena.
Example sentences
  • The most famous is probably the Colosseum where thousands of Roman citizens would gather for their entertainment - be it animals fighting or gladiators etc.
  • Now the games that involved, and we can basically say that they were blood sports, they might involve pitting of slaves or prisoners of war, against wild animals or gladiators.
  • Telling Verus' story takes viewers into his world, showing how gladiators really fought and trained and how the greatest amphitheatre of all was built.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin, from gladius 'sword'.

Derivatives

gladiatorial

1
Pronunciation: /ˌɡladɪəˈtɔːrɪəl/
adjective
Example sentences
  • The Colosseum was the greatest building in Ancient Rome but much smaller amphitheatres were built in Roman Britain and gladiatorial fights may have occurred in these.
  • Although gladiators were clearly Roman, the values presented in gladiatorial single combat were central to Greek culture as well as to Roman.
  • Another chance to see the spectacular gladiatorial combat re-enactment by the gladiators of Britannia.

Definition of gladiator in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day jaunt
Pronunciation: dʒɔːnt
noun
a short excursion or journey made for pleasure