Definition of glut in English:

glut

Line breaks: glut
Pronunciation: /glʌt
 
/

noun

An excessively abundant supply of something: there is a glut of cars on the market
More example sentences
  • Consequently, a large amount of secondhand homes are coming onto the market and there's a glut of supply.
  • Comics crashed in 1993, with a glut of titles and excessive print runs.
  • There is a glut of second-hand cars in the market which has depressed the trade-in value of old cars by as much as £1,000 compared with six months ago, according to car dealers.
Synonyms
surplus, excess, surfeit, superfluity, overabundance, superabundance, oversupply, mountain; too many, too much, more than enough, plethora
informal more … than one can shake a stick at
rare nimiety

verb (gluts, glutting, glutted)

[with object] Back to top  
1Supply or fill to excess: the roads are glutted with cars
More example sentences
  • While this extra supply gluts every market, there is not the demand that would have been in ordinary circumstances.
  • The unemployed crowded the city, and were sustained by state imports of grain, now available as tribute, which glutted the markets, fed the soldiers, and were from time to time distributed to the populace at cheap rates.
  • The market was further glutted by the entry of Vietnam, which grew from a virtual nonproducer in 1990 into the second largest coffee producer in the world by 2000.
Synonyms
cram full, fill to excess, overfill, overload, oversupply, saturate, supersaturate, flood, inundate, deluge, swamp; choke, clog
informal stuff
1.1 archaic Satisfy fully: he planned a treacherous murder to glut his desire for revenge
More example sentences
  • Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose, / Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, / Or on the wealth of globed peonies hold the simplest remedy for overcoming an attack of the blues.
  • Like the catalogue of pastoral images that Keats includes in his famous ode, a city building awash in rain has become a perfect place for anyone beset by a melancholy fit to glut her sorrow.

Origin

Middle English: probably via Old French from Latin gluttire 'to swallow'; related to glutton.

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