Definition of grant in English:

grant

Line breaks: grant
Pronunciation: /grɑːnt
 
/

verb

[usually with two objects]
  • 2Agree or admit to (someone) that (something) is true: he hasn’t made much progress, I’ll grant you that
    More example sentences
    • Okay, that may be true Simon granted him, but he might be gay and he thought that London was an extraordinary example of feminine beauty.
    • I did have time to think ‘oh no’ (very useful, I grant you) and turn to follow her progress.
    • Especially since it's true (only an added benefit these days, I grant you.)
    Synonyms
    admit, accept, concede, yield, cede, allow, appreciate, recognize, acknowledge, confess; agree, concur, go along with

noun

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  • 1A sum of money given by a government or other organization for a particular purpose: a research grant
    More example sentences
    • The money is used for small grants to deserving organizations and individuals.
    • The 18 per cent grant set aside in the budget will be used appropriately for this purpose.
    • The money will enable Essex Police to use the main grant for its intended purpose - crime prevention.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1 [mass noun] formal The action of granting something: we had to recommend the grant or refusal of broadcasting licences
    More example sentences
    • This would, therefore, keep issues such as grant of visas and immigration policies very much alive in the days to come.
    • In their dissenting note both the members had stated that the committee did not have the power to go into the question of grant or refusal of minority statues to anyone.
    • By the late Sixties, corruption spread to more areas of administration, particularly large projects and grant of permits, licences and quotas.
  • 1.2 Law A legal conveyance or formal conferment: a grant of probate
    More example sentences
    • The most sought-after expression of patronage was a grant of land, conferring both wealth and status.
    • The estate as of the death, whatever it was, if any, passes to the executor from the will not on the grant of probate, of course.
    • But it is to the discretion of the bank/building society that hold the assets whether or not they require to see the legal document called a grant of Probate or Letters of administration.

Phrases

take for granted

  • 1Fail to properly appreciate (someone or something), especially as a result of overfamiliarity: the comforts that people take for granted
    More example sentences
    • The right to own land and other property is taken for granted in many countries.
    • Everything ran smoothly for the next two months, but I guess I took things for granted.
    • I know I took you for granted, expecting you always to be around when that's not possible.

Derivatives

grantable

adjective
More example sentences
  • Capital punishment was legal in Ireland until only a few weeks ago and it was grantable if you killed a member of the Gardai (the police force in Ireland).
  • You should be able to develop most applications with just the user grantable capabilities.
  • Actions you can do on the person view - granting, editing, or revoking - are limited by the amount of grantable authority you have.

granter

noun
More example sentences
  • It's no secret that credit granters are a big part of the problem in identity theft and credit scams.
  • It sounds all too much like the previous case, with the council using its powers as landowner and granter of planning permission to try to force through highly unpopular schemes.
  • The authority of the UN and the key position of the Security Council as the generator of mandates, the overseer of security maintenance operations, and the granter of legitimacy, was defended.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French granter 'consent to support', variant of creanter 'to guarantee', based on Latin credere 'entrust'.

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