Definition of grasp in English:

grasp

Line breaks: grasp
Pronunciation: /grɑːsp
 
/

verb

[with object]

noun

[in singular] Back to top  

Phrases

grasp at straws

see straw.

grasp the nettle

British Tackle a difficulty boldly.
[because a nettle stings when touched lightly, but not when grasped firmly]
More example sentences
  • Tackling mental health, grasping the nettle of introducing rights-based legislation will come at a cost.
  • He said: ‘I am pleased that the Prime Minister is now re-examining my proposals but we shall see whether the Government really grasps the nettle regarding this issue.’
  • He warned the country could be facing another crisis unless the next Government grasps the nettle of public spending.

Derivatives

graspable

adjective
More example sentences
  • The assumption is that things graspable by intellect alone belong to a realm above the material, corporeal world and hence are timeless.
  • For another thing, it robs you of the kind of moral focus that makes for more unambiguous, and thus easily graspable, art.
  • Just as a nuclear physicist can say words that have no meaning to me, an actor can use the words ‘rhythm’ or ‘intention’, and mean something very specific that is not easily graspable by those who haven't studied it.

grasper

noun
More example sentences
  • It's time for them to stand up to the grabbers and graspers.
  • These trocars allow for passage of long, fiber-optic telescopes and narrow instruments, such as graspers, scissors, babcocks, and staplers, to perform the surgical procedure.
  • The graspers get more food, more resources and will always out-compete the misers, because when there are resources, the misers get less for their children.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps related to grope.

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a small amount; a little