Definition of guile in English:

guile

Line breaks: guile
Pronunciation: /ɡʌɪl
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
Sly or cunning intelligence: he used all his guile and guts to free himself from the muddle he was in
More example sentences
  • They seem to have got some grim kick out out of their cunning, duplicity, guile and secrecy.
  • Being able to think and reason the survival of the fittest wasn't just down to strength but also wits, guile and cunning.
  • So she used her guile and cunning to protect the tiny innocents: she adopted twins.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, probably from Old Norse; compare with wile.

Derivatives

guileful

adjective
More example sentences
  • But the guileful guerrilla methods of Central Asian warriors have stayed the same since the 13 th century.
  • Their guileful arrangement begins with Armstrong's verse and elusively shifts to the 1937 ballad.
  • His guileful persona shouldn't come through until he finally agrees to a live interview on Good Morning America.

guilefully

adverb
More example sentences
  • Simon Willacy bowled guilefully in an 18 over spell, well supported by off-spinner Horsfall.
  • Not even the critics, essential scribes in any revolution, are noted, except by Rainer (speaking to a confrere on the Atlas video), who says guilefully, ‘And all the critics were outraged.’
  • The hole in the tiled floor yawned at her, deceptively innocent, guilefully welcoming.

Definition of guile in:

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