Share this entry

Share this page

hearken

Line breaks: heark¦en
Pronunciation: /ˈhɑːk(ə)n
 
/
(also harken)

Definition of hearken in English:

verb

[no object]
1 archaic Listen: he refused to hearken to Tom’s words of wisdom
More example sentences
  • The Torah tells us listen, hear, and hearken on whichever level you are able.
  • Basically, the manufacturers are accusing the Government of not hearkening to their submissions, which they say would have done a lot to reduce their production costs.
  • At last, the Hebrews have hearkened unto that voice in the wilderness, that great prophet who came down off the mountain.
2 (hearken back to) another way of saying hark back to (see hark).
Example sentences
  • But, that - I was not surprised at the initial Soviet response that is - sort of hearkens back to the Cold War days when they tried to deny at first that it happened and then try to cover it up.
  • Taylor's funk-influenced style hearkens back to the days when Motown was pounding out hit after soulful hit, without relying on sentimentalism or retro-chic.
  • Given the fact that most of this paraphernalia hearkens back to movies of yore, only a modern projection screen, like the ones in Vic's lecture theatres, seems out of place.

Origin

Old English heorcnian; probably related to hark. The spelling with ea (dating from the 16th century) is due to association with hear.

Words that rhyme with hearken

Aachen, darken, kraken, Marcan, Petrarchan

Definition of hearken in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day terpsichorean
Pronunciation: ˌtəːpsɪkəˈriːən
adjective
relating to dancing