Definition of hence in English:

hence

Line breaks: hence
Pronunciation: /hɛns
 
/

adverb

1As a consequence; for this reason: many vehicle journeys (and hence a lot of pollution) would be saved
More example sentences
  • Most houses are built on the highest sites, hence the reason some frogs end up in gardens and even indoors if they get a chance.
  • Target dates of the original plan were over-ambitious, hence the reason for a review of the targets.
  • Undernutrition is hence not only a consequence of poverty but also a cause.
Synonyms
in consequence, consequently, as a consequence, for this reason, therefore, thus, so, accordingly, as a result, because of that, that being so, that being the case, on that account; Latinergo
2From now (used after a period of time): two years hence they might say something different
More example sentences
  • It is this practice that he spends all his time doing now, but there were others he spent a lot of time doing in New York many years hence.
  • Mercifully, when McConnell strolls into Scotstoun a week hence, she will be accorded her due recognition.
3 (also from hence) archaic From here: hence, be gone
More example sentences
  • They spared him a little before he went from hence and was seen no more.
  • And then they went from hence, and were seen no more.
  • Fathers, from hence trust not your daughters' minds by what you see them act.

Origin

Middle English hennes (in sense 3): from earlier henne (from Old English heonan, of Germanic origin, related to he) + -s3 (later respelled -ce to denote the unvoiced sound).

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Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict